Amazon

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See also: amazon

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English, from Latin, from Ancient Greek Ἀμαζών (Amazṓn).

Noun[edit]

Amazon (plural Amazons)

  1. (Greek mythology) A member of a mythical race of female warriors inhabiting the Black Sea area.
  2. A female warrior.
  3. A tall, strong, or athletic woman.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Spanish, Río Amazonas. It is common belief that the Spanish explorer Francisco de Orellana fought a battle against a tribe of Tapuya natives, in which the women fought alongside the men, and that he derived the name from the Amazons in Greek mythology.

Proper noun[edit]

the Amazon

  1. A river of South America that flows through Brazil for about 4000 miles to the South Atlantic.
  2. A region including much of this river; specifically, the region of the Amazon Rainforest, or of the Amazon River Basin.
  3. Used attributively in compounds.
    the Amazon River; the Amazon Rainforest; the Amazon Basin
    Amazon milk frog
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

Amazon (plural Amazons)

  1. Any of the large parrots from the genus Amazona.

Etymology 3[edit]

Chosen by Jeff Bezos in 1994 as a word beginning with 'A' which had existing connotations (see meanings listed in etymologies 1 & 2) of being exotic, different, and (as the Amazon River) the largest of its kind in the world.[1]

Proper noun[edit]

Amazon

  1. Amazon.com Inc, a very large internet retailer

Verb[edit]

Amazon (third-person singular simple present Amazons, present participle Amazoning, simple past and past participle Amazoned)

  1. (transitive) To overwhelm or obliterate, in the context of an Internet start-up vastly outperforming its brick-and-mortar competition.
    • 1998, George Anders, "Discomfort Zone: Some Big Companies Long to Embrace Web But Settle for Flirtation — They Fear Online Marketing Could Cause Sales Staffs And Distributors to Rebel — A Risk of Getting ‘Amazoned’", The Wall Street Journal, 1998-11-04, p. A1. [1]
      Those who hesitate risk being "amazoned," forfeiting business to an Internet newcomer, in the way that bookstore chains have lost ground to Amazon.com Inc., the online bookseller.
    • 1999, Andrew Wileman, "Smart cookies: Get set to Amazon", Management Today. Aug 1999, p. 79 [2]
      Venture capitalists' desks are thick with business plans promising ‘we're going to Amazon the insurance/travel/property business...’
    • 1999, Tim Smith, InternetWeek (786), "Getting Customers Totally Integrated – Cisco CIO Pete Solvik", 1999-10-25, p. 98 [3]
      Take the example of MetalSite.com, which is owned by steel companies. The steel companies aren't getting "Amazoned" by a start-up but, rather, they are doing the "Amazoning" within their own industry.
    • 1999, "Amazon Expands", InternetWeek (789), 1999-11-15, p. 11 [4]
      Amazon.com may soon be "amazoning" a few more industries.
    • 2000, Bob Tedeschi, "E-Commerce Report: Web and catalog businesses are crossing into storefront territory, creating parallel avenues of retailing", The New York Times, 2000-11-20, p. C12 [5]
      Gone are the days when they agonized about being "Amazoned", or blind-sided by a dot-com ....
    • 2001, Saul Hansell, "Web Sales of Airline Tickets Are Making Hefty Advances", The New York Times, 2001-07-04, p. A1 [6]
      In other industries, established companies are pulling people and money away from their Internet operations, as their fear of being "Amazoned" by start-ups has subsided.
    • 2001, Steve Lohr, "Gearhead Nation: A Time Out for Technophilia", The New York Times, 2001-11-18, p. WK4 [7]
      Meanwhile, traditional companies would be obliterated — "Amazoned" — by Internet upstarts.
    • 2002, Scott Harris, "Roots in Israel, Head in Silicon Valley", The New York Times, 2002-06-30, p. B8 [8]
      "Everybody was afraid of getting Amazoned," Mr. Landan said. "They didn't want to get left behind."

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ann Byers, Jeff Bezos: the founder of amazon.com, pp. 46-7, Rosen Publishing Group, 2007, ISBN 1-4042-0717-1

Finnish[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Amazon

  1. Amazon (river)

Declension[edit]

Inflection of Amazon (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
nominative Amazon
genitive Amazonin
partitive Amazonia
illative Amazoniin
singular plural
nominative Amazon
accusative nom. Amazon
gen. Amazonin
genitive Amazonin
partitive Amazonia
inessive Amazonissa
elative Amazonista
illative Amazoniin
adessive Amazonilla
ablative Amazonilta
allative Amazonille
essive Amazonina
translative Amazoniksi
instructive
abessive Amazonitta
comitative

Compounds[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

Amazon

  1. Rōmaji transcription of アマゾン

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Amāzon f (genitive Amāzonis); third declension

  1. an Amazon
  2. a female warrior

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative Amāzon Amāzonēs
genitive Amāzonis Amāzonum
dative Amāzonī Amāzonibus
accusative Amāzonem Amāzonēs
ablative Amāzone Amāzonibus
vocative Amāzon Amāzonēs

References[edit]