Mecca

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: mecca

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Arabic مَكَّة(makka, Mecca).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɛkə/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛkə

Proper noun[edit]

Mecca

  1. A large city in the Hejaz, Saudi Arabia, the holiest place in Islam, location of the sacred Ka'ba, and to which Muslims are required to make a hajj at least once in their lifetime.
  2. A census-designated place in Riverside County, California, United States.
  3. A surname​.
    • 1968, United States. President's Committee on Employment of the Handicapped, The Seriously Handicapped and the Voluntary Health Agency: Proceedings of a Panel Discussion, Annual Meeting, May 2-3, 1968, page 32:
      MR. HOWE: I would like to ask Mr. Mecca this question : does he think there would be substantial duplication between the agency that he is suggesting, and the current Governors' Committees on Employment of the Handicapped.
      MR. MECCA []
  4. (uncommon) A unisex given name, mostly borne by women.
    • 1912, The Arrow of Pi Beta Phi, page 107:
      Mrs. Mecca Marie Varney and son are successful lecturers and debaters on various topics of current interest, such as suffrage, etc. Her home is in Paw Paw, Mich. Her lectures are managed by her husband, Charles E. Varney.
    • 2020, Born This Way Foundation reporters, Lady Gaga, Channel Kindness: Stories of Kindness and Community, Feiwel & Friends (→ISBN)
      Just then, a young boy—named Mecca, as we learned later—arrived at the scene with the flight attendants who had been escorting him to his parents. In the midst of the frantic feeding of the protein bar, Mecca quietly announced:
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:Mecca.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

Mecca (plural Meccas)

  1. (figuratively) Any place considered to be a very important place to visit by people with a particular interest.
    • 1826, The Lancet, “Sketches of the Medical Schools of Scotland”, volume 11, page 254:
      It was consequently the “Mecca,” the “Delphic Oracle,” the “Vale of Egeria,” to which all studious pilgrims should resort to drink of the pure springs of knowledge; […]
    • 1935, George Goodchild, chapter 5, in Death on the Centre Court:
      By one o'clock the place was choc-a-bloc. […] The restaurant was packed, and the promenade between the two main courts and the subsidiary courts was thronged with healthy-looking youngish people, drawn to the Mecca of tennis from all parts of the country.
    • 1991, The Economist, The Economist Newspaper Ltd.
      On the other side of the Atlantic, stores in Paris's chic Avenue Montaigne, a mecca for Japanese tourists, said that sales to foreigners had fallen sharply.
    • 1997, John Romano, Muscle Meals, page 14.
      Living in Venice, California and training at the Mecca of bodybuilding, Gold's Gym, I've seen some of the world's most dedicated and hard-training athletes.
    • 2014, Rick Steves, Rick Steves' Europe Through the Back Door 2015: The Travel Skills Handbook, Avalon Travel, →ISBN, 705:
      I say how much I like the shabby lounge atmosphere of a ruin pub, and Laura declares that this one, Szimpla Kert (which means “Simple Garden”), is the mecca of ruin pubs.

Alternative forms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Mecca f

  1. Obsolete spelling of Meca