Schacht

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See also: schacht

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Middle Low German schacht, from Old Saxon skaft, from Proto-West Germanic *skaft. Doublet of Schaft.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ʃaxt/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

Schacht m (strong, genitive Schachtes or Schachts, plural Schächte)

  1. shaft, mineshaft (tunnel)

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Russian: шахта (šaxta)
  • Serbo-Croatian: šaht

Further reading[edit]

  • Schacht” in Duden online
  • Schacht” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

German Low German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German schacht, from Old Saxon skaft, from Proto-West Germanic *skaft.

Cognate with Dutch Low Saxon skacht, Plautdietsch Schajcht (legging), English shaft, Swedish skaft and German Schaft. The sense "beating" is from the canes which were used to beat misbehaving pupils in 19th-century schools.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (northern German Low German) IPA(key): [ʃaxt]
  • (Westphalia, Eastphalia, eastern Frisia) IPA(key): [skaxt]
  • (Westphalia) IPA(key): [sxaxt]

Noun[edit]

Schacht m

  1. (in several dialects, including Low Prussian) a shaft, a pole to which something is attached
    1. (in some dialects, including Low Prussian) a stalk (e.g. a beanstalk)
  2. (in some dialects, including Low Prussian) a cane, a stick
  3. (in several dialects, including Low Prussian, by extension, used without article) a beating
    Ik hebbe Schacht kręgen.
    I have been beaten. (literally: I have gotten [the] shaft.)
  4. (in several dialects) a shaft, a tunnel driven vertically into the ground
  5. (in several dialects, including Low Prussian) a bootleg, the part of a boot which covers the shin and calf

Synonyms[edit]