Talk:@

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@

The Portuguese and Spanish entries need to translate "@" as the equivalent English symbol, not give a definition; if there is no equivalent symbol, these definitions need to be turned into glosses. — Paul G 09:10, 3 February 2008 (UTC)

@ is used in Portuguese, Spanish and virtually all languages in the same Internet sense, but it has a different name deriving from a different meaning. It would be better to have a Translation section detailing the name in each language than to have hundreds of separate language entries on the page. In Basque, @ is a bildua (rounded a); in many languages, it means snail: Belarusian сьлімак, Southern French petit escargot, Welsh malwen or malwoden, Ukrainian слимачок or равлик, Turkish salyangoz, Korean 다슬기, Italian chiocciola; in many languages, it means monkey, referring to a monkey’s tail: Bulgarian маймунско а, Croatian manki, Dutch apenstaartje, German Klammeraffe, Polish małpa or małpka, Romanian coadă de maimuţăj, Slovene afna, Serbian мајмун, Luxembourgish Afeschwanz; some languages call it a cat’s tail: Finnish kissanhäntä; some languages call it a word for rollmops, a pickled herring rollup: Czech zavináč; some languages call it an elephant-trunk a: Danish snabel-a, Faroese snápila, Swedish snabel-a; some languages borrow from English: Finnish ät-merkki (at sign), Japanese アットマーク (atto mâku); some languages call it a dog: Russian собака; in some languages, it’s an ear: Ukrainian вухо; in Taiwan, it’s 小老鼠, or little mouse; in Greenlandic, it is aajusaq, meaning "a-like thing"; the Greeks call it a duck: παπάκι; Hungarians call it a worm: kukac; in Tagalog, it’s utong, or nipple; the Israelis call it strudel, שטרודל or כרוכית; in Morse code, it’s a commat or "A C" (·--·-·); the Iberian languages call it after a weight: Catalan arrova, French arobase or arrobe, Spanish arroba, Portuguese arroba.
All of these and others should be included on the @ page, and I think the best way is in a Translation section. —Stephen 20:58, 3 February 2008 (UTC)
But this isn't called "@" in English (unless we're having a really bad day), it's called "at" or "the at sign"; surely that is where the translations should go. -- Visviva 17:11, 9 February 2008 (UTC)
Okay, added to at sign. —Stephen 18:10, 9 February 2008 (UTC)



@ to represent "a or o"[edit]

In some modern contexts (sociology courses, etc.) the @ is used to represent "a or o", e.g. Chican@, Latin@ for "Chicano/Chicana" and "Latino/Latina". Equinox 15:30, 23 March 2013 (UTC)