abrier

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French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French, from Old French abrier (to cover), itself mostly likely from Late Latin aprīcāre, from Latin aprīcārī, present active infinitive of aprīcor (warm in the sun), from aprīcus (sunny). The form abrier may have been of southern French origin, possibly via Old Provençal abriar (cf. the dialectal French form avrier). Compare Occitan, Catalan, Spanish and Portuguese abrigar.

Alternatively, and less likely, from a Late Latin abrīgāre (to cover, shelter), from a- + brīgāre, from Frankish *berīhan (to cover, protect), from Proto-Germanic *bi- + *wrīhaną (to cover, clothe), from Proto-Indo-European *werḱ-, *werǵ- (to twist, weave, tie together). Cognate with Old High German birīhan (to cover), Old English bewrēon (to cover, enwrap, protect). Compare Spanish abrigar, which may be related; alternatively, both may derive from a Latin aprīcō, aprīcāre.

Late Latin abrīgāre may have also been crossed with Frankish *bergan (to take care of, protect, hide), from Proto-Germanic *berganą (to care for), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰergʰ- (to take care), due to similarity in form and meaning[1]. If so, this would relate the word also to Old High German bergan (to shelter) (German bergen), and Old English beorgan (to save, preserve). More at borrow.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

abrier

  1. (dialectal) to cover with a bedcover; to tuck in
  2. (archaic or dialectal) Alternative form of abriter

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Diez, An etymological dictionary of the Romance languages; chiefly from the German, "Abrigo."

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Mostly likely from Late Latin apricāre, from Latin aprīcārī, present active infinitive of aprīcor (warm in the sun), from aprīcus (sunny). The form abrier may have been of southern French origin, possibly via Old Provençal abriar (cf. the dialectal French form avrier). Compare Occitan, Catalan, Spanish and Portuguese abrigar.

Alternatively, and less likely, from a Late Latin abrigāre (to cover, shelter), from a- + brigare, from Frankish *berīhan (to cover, protect), from Proto-Germanic *bi- + *wrīhaną (to cover, clothe), from Proto-Indo-European *werk'-, *werg'- (to twist, weave, tie together). Cognate with Old High German birīhan (to cover), Old English bewrēon (to cover, enwrap, protect).

Verb[edit]

abrier

  1. to shelter
  2. (reflexive, s'abrier) to take shelter; to shelter oneself

Conjugation[edit]

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]