abri

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See also: abrí

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from French abri ‎(shelter), from Old French abrier ‎(to shelter), see below.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

abri ‎(plural abris)

  1. A shelter; a cavity in a hillside; a shelter on the side of hill with an overhung rock as its roof[1] [First attested in the early 19th century.][2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Philip Babcock Gove (editor), Webster's Third International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged (G. & C. Merriam Co., 1976 [1909], ISBN 0-87779-101-5), page 6
  2. ^ Lesley Brown (editor), The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th edition (Oxford University Press, 2003 [1933], ISBN 978-0-19-860575-7), page 8

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French abri, from Old French abri ‎(a place where one is sheltered from the elements or harm), from abrier ‎(to cover), from Late Latin abrigare ‎(to cover, shelter), from a- + brigare, from Frankish *berīhan ‎(to cover, protect), from Proto-Germanic *bi- ‎(be-) + *wrīhaną ‎(to cover, clothe), from Proto-Indo-European *werḱ-, *werǵ- ‎(to twist, weave, tie together). Cognate with Old High German birīhan ‎(to cover), Old English bewrēon ‎(to cover, enwrap, protect).

Late Latin abrigare may have also crossed with Old Frankish *bergan ‎(to take care of, protect, hide), from Proto-Germanic *berganą ‎(to care for), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰergʰ- ‎(to take care), due to similarity in form and meaning[1]. If so, this would relate the word also to Old High German bergan ‎(to shelter) (German bergen) and Old English beorgan ‎(to save, preserve). More at borrow.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

abri m ‎(plural abris)

  1. A shelter or refuge against the elements or physical danger.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Diez, An etymological dictionary of the Romance languages; chiefly from the German, "Abrigo."

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Hiligaynon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish abrir.

Verb[edit]

ábri

  1. to open (as a window), unlock (as a gate), or turn on (as a stove)
  2. to begin, commence

Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

abri m ‎(oblique plural abris, nominative singular abris, nominative plural abri)

  1. shelter (physical protection from harm, harsh conditions, etc.)

Etymology[edit]

From abrier ‎(to cover), from Late Latin abrigare ‎(to cover, shelter), from a- + brigare, from Frankish *berīhan ‎(to cover, protect), from Proto-Germanic *bi- ‎(be-) + *wrīhaną ‎(to cover, clothe), from Proto-Indo-European *werḱ-, *werǵ- ‎(to twist, weave, tie together). Cognate with Old High German birīhan ‎(to cover), Old English bewrēon ‎(to cover, enwrap, protect).

Late Latin abrigare may have also crossed with Old Frankish *bergan ‎(to take care of, protect, hide), from Proto-Germanic *berganą ‎(to care for), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰergʰ- ‎(to take care), due to similarity in form and meaning[1]. If so, this would relate the word also to Old High German bergan ‎(to shelter) (German bergen) and Old English beorgan ‎(to save, preserve). More at borrow.


Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

abri

  1. Second-person plural (vós) affirmative imperative of abrir
  2. First-person singular (eu) preterite indicative of abrir
    • ^ Diez, An etymological dictionary of the Romance languages; chiefly from the German, "Abrigo."