abrigar

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Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan (compare the form abriar and Occitan abrigar), most likely from Late Latin apricāre, from Latin aprīcārī, present active infinitive of aprīcor[1], from aprīcus. Compare Spanish abrigar, French abrier.

Alternatively, and less likely, from Late Latin abrigāre (to cover, shelter), from a- + brigare, from Frankish *birīhan (to cover, protect), from Proto-Germanic *bi- + *wrīhaną (to cover, clothe), from Proto-Indo-European *werk'-, *werg'- (to twist, weave, tie together). Cognate with Old High German birīhan (to cover), Old English bewrēon (to cover, enwrap, protect). Alternatively from Latin apricāre, present active infinitive of apricō (warm in the sun), from apricus (sunny).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

abrigar (first-person singular present abrigo, past participle abrigat)

  1. to wrap up, to cover
  2. to keep warm
  3. to shelter

Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese abrigar, of disputed origin: most likely from Late Latin apricāre, from Latin aprīcārī, present active infinitive of aprīcor (warm in the sun), from aprīcus (sunny).

Alternatively, and less likely, from Late Latin abrigāre (to cover, shelter), from a- + brigare, from Frankish *birīhan (to cover, protect), from Proto-Germanic *bi- + *wrīhaną (to cover, clothe), from Proto-Indo-European *werk'-, *werg'- (to twist, weave, tie together).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ɐ.bɾi.ˈɡaɾ/, [ɐ.βɾi.ˈɣaɾ]
  • Hyphenation: a‧bri‧gar

Verb[edit]

abrigar (first-person singular present indicative abrigo, past participle abrigado)

  1. (transitive) harbour (provide refuge for)

Conjugation[edit]

Quotations[edit]

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:abrigar.

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Most likely from Late Latin apricāre, from Latin aprīcārī, present active infinitive of aprīcor (warm in the sun), from aprīcus (sunny) [1][2] Compare Portuguese and Catalan abrigar, also French abrier.

Alternatively, and less likely, from Late Latin abrigāre (to cover, shelter), from a- + brigare, from Frankish *birīhan (to cover, protect), from Proto-Germanic *bi- + *wrīhaną (to cover, clothe), from Proto-Indo-European *werk'-, *werg'- (to twist, weave, tie together). Cognate with Old High German birīhan (to cover), Old English bewrēon (to cover, enwrap, protect).

Late Latin abrigare may have also been crossed with Frankish *bergan (to take care of, protect, hide), from Proto-Germanic *berganą (to care for), from Proto-Indo-European *bhergh- (to take care), due to similarity in form and meaning[3]. If so, this would relate the word also to Old High German bergan (to shelter) (German bergen), and Old English beorgan (to save, preserve). More at borrow.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /abɾiˈɡaɾ/, [aβɾiˈɣaɾ]

Verb[edit]

abrigar (first-person singular present abrigo, first-person singular preterite abrigué, past participle abrigado)

  1. (transitive, reflexive) to wrap up (to put on abundant clothing)
    Estas mantas abrigan mucho.
    These blankets are very warm.
  2. to cover
  3. to shelter, to protect
    Synonym: resguardar
    La pared me abrigaba de la lluvia.
    The wall protected me from the rain.

Conjugation[edit]

  • Rule: g becomes a gu before e.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ https://www.scribd.com/document/157203089/Diccionario-Critico-Etimologico-castellano-A-CA-Corominas-Joan-pdf
  3. ^ Diez, An etymological dictionary of the Romance languages; chiefly from the German, "Abrigo."

Further reading[edit]