ambages

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English ambages, from Old French ambages (modern French ambages), from Latin ambāges, from ambi- + agere (to drive).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ambages pl (plural only)

  1. (archaic) Indirect or roundabout ways of talking; circumlocution.
    • 1632, Vicar's Virgil
      Thus from her cell Cumæan Sibyl sings / Ambiguous ambages, the cloyster rings / With the shrill sound thereof, in most dark strains.
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970, page 169:
      Having thus briefly anatomized the body and soul of man, [] I may now freely proceed to treat of my intended subject, to most men's capacity; and after many ambages, perspicuously define what this melancholy is [].
  2. (archaic) Indirect or roundabout routes or directions.
    • 1993, Anthony Burgess, A Dead Man In Deptford:
      Paris put fear into him, a city of monstrous size to which London was but a market town. Its ambages of streets bewildered.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


French[edit]

Noun[edit]

ambages

  1. plural of ambage

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From ambi- (both) +‎ agō (I drive) +‎ -ēs (noun forming suffix).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ambāgēs f (genitive ambāgis); third declension

  1. circuit (roundabout way)
  2. long story
  3. circumlocution, evasion, digression
  4. ambiguity

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative ambāgēs ambāgēs
Genitive ambāgis ambāgum
Dative ambāgī ambāgibus
Accusative ambāgem ambāgēs
Ablative ambāge ambāgibus
Vocative ambāgēs ambāgēs

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • ambages in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879
  • ambages in Charlton T. Lewis, An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers, 1891
  • ambages in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • ambages in Gaffiot, Félix, Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette, 1934
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden, Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co., 1894
    • to speak without circumlocution: missis ambagibus dicere

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Circa 1355, borrowed from Latin ambāges.

Noun[edit]

ambages m pl

  1. circumlocution, ambages (indirect or roundabout ways of talking)

Descendants[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ambāges.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /amˈbaxes/, [ãmˈba.xes]

Noun[edit]

ambages m pl (plural only)

  1. circumlocution, ambages (indirect or roundabout ways of talking)
    Synonyms: circunlocución, circunloquios
    • 2020 September 6, “Johnson prepara a los británicos para un Brexit duro a finales de año”, in El País[2]:
      Pero en esta ocasión, todos los actores reconocen que el Gobierno de Johnson comienza a mostrar sin ambages sus verdaderas cartas, y que ya no disimula su objetivo final de abandonar con las menores ataduras posibles su relación con la UE.
      But on this occasion, all the actors recognize that the Johnson government is beginning to [unambiguously] show its true colors, and that it no longer hides its final objective of ending its relationship with the EU with as few ties as possible.
  2. (rare) ambages (indirect or roundabout routes or directions)
    Synonym: rodeos

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]