bach

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See also: Bach, bách, bạch, and bac̱h

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probable shortening of bachelor.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bach (plural baches)

  1. (New Zealand, northern) A holiday home, usually small and near the beach, often with only one or two rooms and of simple construction.

Synonyms[edit]

  • crib (New Zealand) (in southern South Island)

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Verb[edit]

bach (third-person singular simple present baches, present participle baching, simple past and past participle bached)

  1. (US) To live apart from women, as during the period when a divorce is in progress. (Compare bachelor pad.)

Anagrams[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Onomatopoeic.

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

bach

  1. boom, bam, pow, wham (used when imitating a sudden, hard hit)

Usage notes[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

verb

Further reading[edit]

  • bach in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • bach in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Welsh bych, from Proto-Brythonic *bɨx, from Proto-Celtic *bikkos.

Adjective[edit]

bach (feminine singular bach, plural bach, equative lleied, comparative llai, superlative lleiaf)

  1. small, little, short
    Na, rwy'n mynd ar y trên bach.[1]No, I'm taking the little train.
  2. not fully-grown or developed, young
  3. insignificant, unimportant, humble
  4. small (of business, etc.)
  5. lowercase (of letter)
Derived terms[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Welsh and Old Welsh bach, from Proto-Celtic *bakkos, from Proto-Indo-European *bak-.

Noun[edit]

bach m (plural bachau)

  1. hook
  2. hinge
    Synonym: colfach
  3. (typography) bracket, brace
Derived terms[edit]
Compounds[edit]
Hyponyms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
bach fach mach unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “bach”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

References[edit]