baroque

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See also: Baroque

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Via French baroque (which originally meant a pearl of irregular shape), from Portuguese barroco (irregular pearl); related to Spanish barrueco and Italian barocco, of uncertain ultimate origin, but possibly from Latin verrūca (wart). It has been suggested that the term derives from Baroco, a technical term from scholastic logic.

Pronunciation[edit]

Rhymes: -ɒk
Rhymes: -əʊk

Adjective[edit]

baroque (comparative baroquer, superlative baroquest)

  1. Ornate, intricate, decorated, laden with detail.
  2. Complex and beautiful, despite an outward irregularity.
  3. Chiseled from stone, or shaped from wood, in a garish, crooked, twisted, or slanted sort of way, grotesque.
  4. Embellished with figures and forms such that every level of relief gives way to more details and contrasts.
  5. Characteristic of Western art music of about the same period.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Middle French baroque, originally denoting a pearl of irregular shape, from Italian barocco, Spanish barrueco, or Portuguese barroco, all possibly from Latin verrūca (wart).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ba.ʁɔk/
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

baroque (plural baroques)

  1. baroque (all senses)

Descendants[edit]

  • English: baroque
  • Spanish: barroco

Further reading[edit]