bastion

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: bastión and Bastion

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
A bastion (1)

Etymology[edit]

First attested in 1562. From French bastion, from Old French bastille (fortress).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bastion (plural bastions)

  1. (architecture) A projecting part of a rampart or other fortification.
    • 1942, Emily Carr, The Book of Small, "Beginnings," [1]
      [] Fort Camosun had swelled herself from being a little Hudson's Bay Fort, inside a stockade with bastions at the corners, into being the little town of Victoria, and the capital of British Columbia.
  2. A well-fortified position; a stronghold or citadel.
  3. (figuratively) A person, group, or thing, that strongly defends some principle.
    a bastion of hope
    the bastion of democracy
  4. Any large prominence; something that resembles a bastion in size and form.
    • 1938, Norman Lindsay, Age of Consent, Sydney: Ure Smith, published 1962, page 32:
      It spread slowly up from the sea-rim, a welling upwards of pure white light, ghosting the beach with silver and drawing the grey bastions of sandstone out of formless space.

Related terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

bastion (third-person singular simple present bastions, present participle bastioning, simple past and past participle bastioned)

  1. (transitive) To furnish with a bastion.

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Middle French bastion.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˌbɑs.tiˈɔn/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: bas‧ti‧on
  • Rhymes: -ɔn

Noun[edit]

bastion n (plural bastions, diminutive bastionnetje n)

  1. bastion; a projecting part of a rampart
    Synonym: bolwerk

French[edit]

French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French bastion, from Old French bastille (fortress) or Italian bastione. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term..

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bastion m (plural bastions)

  1. bastion
  2. stronghold

Descendants[edit]

  • Polish: bastion

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Italian bastione, via French bastion.

Noun[edit]

bastion m (definite singular bastionen, indefinite plural bastioner, definite plural bastionene)

  1. a bastion (part of a fortification; also figurative)

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Italian bastione, via French bastion.

Noun[edit]

bastion m (definite singular bastionen, indefinite plural bastionar, definite plural bastionane)

  1. a bastion (part of a fortification; also figurative)

References[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French bastion, from Old French bastille (fortress).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bastion m inan (diminutive bastionik)

  1. (architecture) bastion, stronghold (place built to withstand attack)
  2. (figuratively) bastion, stronghold (place of domination by, or refuge or survival of, a particular group or idea)
  3. (figuratively) bastion (a person, group, or thing, that strongly defends some principle)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

adjective

Further reading[edit]

  • bastion in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • bastion in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French bastion.

Noun[edit]

bastion n (plural bastioane)

  1. stronghold

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

bastion c

  1. bastion; a projecting part of a rampart

Declension[edit]

Declension of bastion 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative bastion bastionen bastioner bastionerna
Genitive bastions bastionens bastioners bastionernas