boycott

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See also: Boycott

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Charles Boycott, an English evicting land agent in Ireland who was subject to a boycott organized by the Irish Land League in 1880.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

boycott (third-person singular simple present boycotts, present participle boycotting, simple past and past participle boycotted)

  1. To abstain, either as an individual or a group, from using, buying, or dealing with someone or some organization as an expression of protest.

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Noun[edit]

boycott (plural boycotts)

  1. The act of boycotting.
    • 2019 April 28, Hagai El-Ad, “What kind of democracy deports human rights workers?”, in Yoni Molad, transl., +972 Magazine[1]:
      So, memorize this from now on: Israel is a democracy. A defensive one. We are the victims. The boycott seeks to destroy us. The Europeans are anti-Semites. The Palestinians are terrorists. Leftists are traitors. There is no occupation. The decision of the interior minister to deport Shakir is reasonable under the circumstances. The petitioner must leave Israel. Who’s next?

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French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English boycott.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

boycott m (plural boycotts)

  1. boycott

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