bre

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Bre, BrE, BRE, bré, and Brè

Translingual[edit]

Symbol[edit]

bre

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Breton.

Albanian[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Possibly a short form of Proto-Indo-European *bʰrā́ter (brother) (a reflex of which is otherwise absent in Albanian), parallel to colloquialisms in other languages like English bro and Italian fra; but compare also Greek βρε (vre), ρε (re) and Macedonian бре (bre), море (more), Illyrian *bra with the same meaning, usually considered to derive from Greek μωρέ (moré, stupid, vocative). In the latter case, this word may be a doublet of more.

Interjection[edit]

bre

  1. A friendly exclamation to a person.
    Folni bre, burra!
    Speak, therefore, men!
  2. An exclamation of surprise.
    Bre! Po ç'është kjo?
    Man! What is this?

Related terms[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

bre

  1. Alternative form of brewe

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology 1[edit]

Of uncertain origin.

Noun[edit]

bre m (definite singular breen, indefinite plural breer, definite plural breene)

  1. a glacier
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse breiða.

Verb[edit]

bre (imperative bre, present tense brer, passive bres, simple past bredde or bredte, past participle bredd or bredt, present participle breende)

  1. (also reflexive) to spread
Alternative forms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Of uncertain origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bre m (definite singular breen, indefinite plural brear, definite plural breane)

  1. a glacier

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Turkish bre.

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

bre

  1. hey
  2. wow

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish brí (hill), from Proto-Celtic *brixs, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰŕ̥ǵʰs. Distantly cognate with English borough.

Noun[edit]

bre m

  1. (obsolete) hill
  2. (obsolete) headland

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ottoman Turkish بره(bre), from Greek μωρέ (moré). Doublet of mȏre.

Interjection[edit]

bre (Cyrillic spelling бре)

  1. (Serbia, colloquial) used to insist on or emphasize something being said or commanded, often also stressing the speaker’s perception of evidentness of the thing insisted on: man, I say, I’m telling you, can’t you see
  2. (Serbia, colloquial) used to insist on an answer to or emphasize a question: on earth, the hell
    Šta si bre to uradio!?What the hell did you just do!?
  3. (Serbia, colloquial) used to intensify a preceding interjection

Usage notes[edit]

When marking a statement or question as insistent, bre is ordinarily found either immediately after the verb or at the end of the sentence. However, if an interjection or vocative is present, it can instead appear next to it, following an interjection and following or preceding a vocative. In wh-questions bre can also follow the interrogative pronoun.

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bre (present brer, preterite bredde, supine brett, imperative bre)

  1. (colloquial) Apocopic form of breda (to spread)

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ottoman Turkish بره(bre), from Byzantine Greek βρε (bre) (compare modern Greek βρε (vre) and ρε (re), Serbo-Croatian bre, Albanian bre), probably shortened from μωρέ (mōré, man!, literally fool!) (modern Greek μωρέ (moré)), a frozen vocative of Ancient Greek μωρός (mōrós, stupid).

Interjection[edit]

bre

  1. hey
  2. yo (slang)

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Ladino: bre
  • ? Romanian: bre