commode

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See also: Commode

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Rococo commode, from circa 1760
Neoclassical commode, from circa 1780

Borrowed from French commode. Doublet of comodo.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
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commode (plural commodes)

  1. A low chest of drawers on short legs.
  2. A stand for a washbowl and jug.
  3. (euphemistic) A chair containing a chamber pot.
  4. (euphemistic) A toilet.
  5. (historical) A kind of woman's headdress, raising the hair and fore part of the cap to a great height.
    • (Can we date this quote by Granville and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      Or under high commodes, with looks erect.

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin commodus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kɔ.mɔd/
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

commode (plural commodes)

  1. convenient (of or pertaining to convenience; simple; easy; expedient)

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • German: kommod

Etymology 2[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

commode f (plural commodes)

  1. chest of drawers, commode
  2. (Louisiana) toilet

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

commode

  1. comfortable

Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Adverb[edit]

commodē (comparative commodius, superlative commodissimē)

  1. conveniently
  2. aptly, suitably

Etymology 2[edit]

Adjective[edit]

commode

  1. vocative masculine singular of commodus

References[edit]

  • commode in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • commode in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • commode in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to indulge in apt witticisms: facete et commode dicere
    • (ambiguous) a short, pointed witticism: breviter et commode dictum

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French commode.

Noun[edit]

commode f (plural commodes)

  1. (Jersey) tallboy