donjon

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French donjon.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

donjon ‎(plural donjons)

  1. The fortified tower of a motte or early castle; a keep.
    • 2007, Michael Chabon, Gentlemen of the Road, Sceptre 2008, p. 132:
      [...] the prison fortress called Qomr, a mound of yellowish brick rising up from the left back of the turbid river, in whose donjon by long tradition the warlord was obliged to lay his head.
    • 1819, Walter Scott, Ivanhoe:
      It was a fortress of no great size, consisting of a donjon, or large and high square tower, surrounded by buildings of inferior height, which were encircled by an inner court-yard.

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

From Old French donjon.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: don‧jon

Noun[edit]

donjon m ‎(plural donjons, diminutive donjonnetje n)

  1. donjon, keep

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French, from Old French donjon, dongon ‎(castle keep), from Frankish *dungjo, *dunjon- ‎(dungeon, bower, underground cellar), from Proto-Germanic *dungijǭ, *dungō ‎(enclosed space, vault, bower, treasury), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰengʰ- ‎(to cover). Cognate with Old English dung ‎(prison, dungeon), Old Saxon dung ‎(underground cellar), Old High German tung ‎(underground cellar), Old Norse dyngja ‎(a lady's bower). More at dung.

Alternate etymology traces Old French donjon, from Vulgar Latin *dominio ‘lord's castle’, from Latin dominus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

donjon m ‎(plural donjons)

  1. donjon, keep

External links[edit]


Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

donjon m ‎(oblique plural donjons, nominative singular donjons, nominative plural donjon)

  1. dungeon
    • 12th Century, Béroul, Tristan et Iseut:
      Li chiens gardoit par le donjon.
      The dog was guarding the dungeon.