donjon

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French donjon.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

donjon (plural donjons)

  1. The fortified tower of a motte or early castle; a keep.
    • 2007, Michael Chabon, Gentlemen of the Road, Sceptre 2008, p. 132:
      [...] the prison fortress called Qomr, a mound of yellowish brick rising up from the left back of the turbid river, in whose donjon by long tradition the warlord was obliged to lay his head.
    • 1819, Walter Scott, Ivanhoe:
      It was a fortress of no great size, consisting of a donjon, or large and high square tower, surrounded by buildings of inferior height, which were encircled by an inner court-yard.

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Noun[edit]

donjon m (plural donjons, diminutive donjonnetje n)

  1. donjon, keep

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French, from Old French donjon, dongon (castle keep), from Frankish *dungjo, *dunjon- (dungeon, bower, underground cellar), from Proto-Germanic *dungijō, *dungijǭ, *dungō (enclosed space, vault, bower, treasury), from Proto-Indo-European *dhengh- (to cover). Cognate with Old English dung (prison, dungeon), Old Saxon dung (underground cellar), Old High German tung (underground cellar), Old Norse dyngja (a lady's bower). More at dung.

Alternate etymology traces Old French donjon, from Vulgar Latin *dominio ‘lord's castle’, from Latin dominus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

donjon m (plural donjons)

  1. donjon, keep

Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

donjon m (oblique plural donjons, nominative singular donjons, nominative plural donjon)

  1. dungeon
    • 12th Century, Béroul, Tristan et Iseut:
      Li chiens gardoit par le donjon.
      The dog was guarding the dungeon.