doryphore

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

A modification of doriphore, borrowed from French doryphore (Colorado beetle) by Harold Nicolson in 1952, presumably under the influence of the various senses of pest. The French term was a translation of the New Latin genus Doryphora, itself from Ancient Greek δορυφόρος (doruphóros, lance-bearing; lance-bearer).[1]

Noun[edit]

doryphore (plural doryphores)

  1. (rare, humorous) A petty pedant, a person who complains about minor mistakes.
    • 1952 August 22, Harold Nicolson, Spectator, p. 238:
      Often have I tried to supplement my vocabulary by inventing words, such as ‘couth’, or ‘doriphore’, or ‘hypoulic’, feeling that it is the duty as well as the pastime of a professional writer to make two words bloom where only one bloomed before.
    • 1960 December 9, Daily Telegraph, p. 19:
      The idiomatic implications of such a word as doryphore in his own text is left for the ignorant to guess. (It means a Colorado beetle and, hence, a pest.)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "doryphore, n.", in the Oxford English Dictionary, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From New Latin Doryphora (the former genus of the Colorado beetle), from Ancient Greek δορυφόρος (doruphóros, lance-bearing; lance-bearer).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

doryphore m (plural doryphores)

  1. (biology) Colorado beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata).

Further reading[edit]


Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French doryphore, from New Latin Doryphora, its former genus.

Noun[edit]

doryphore m (plural doryphores)

  1. (biology) Colorado beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata).