pedant

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See also: pédant and Pedant

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French pedant, pedante, from Italian pedante (a teacher, schoolmaster, pedant), of uncertain origin, traced by some sources to Latin paedagogans, present participle of paedagogare ( = to teach, from Greek "paedagogein" = to instruct children ). Confer French pédant.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pedant (plural pedants)

  1. (obsolete) A teacher or schoolmaster.
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, vol. 1 ch. 24:
      I have in my youth oftentimes beene vexed to see a Pedant [tr. pedante] brought in, in most of Italian comedies, for a vice or sport-maker, and the nicke-name of Magister to be of no better signification amongst us.
  2. A person who is overly concerned with formal rules and trivial points of learning.
  3. A person who emphasizes his/her knowledge through the use of vocabulary.

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Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

pedant

  1. third-person plural present active indicative of pedō