couth

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English couth, from Old English cūþ (known, plain, manifest, certain, well known, usual, noted, excellent, famous, intimate, familiar, friendly, related), from Proto-Germanic *kunþaz (known), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵneh₃- (to know). Cognate with Scots couth (known, familiar), Saterland Frisian cut (known), Dutch kond (known), German kund (known), Icelandic kuðr, kunnur (known), Gothic 𐌺𐌿𐌽𐌸𐍃 (kunþs, known), Latin gnosco (to know). Doublet of could.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

couth (comparative more couth, superlative most couth)

  1. (obsolete) known, renowned

Verb[edit]

couth

  1. (obsolete except in adjective use) past participle of can

Etymology 2[edit]

Back-formation from uncouth.

Adjective[edit]

couth (comparative more couth, superlative most couth)

  1. Marked by or possessing a high degree of sophistication; cultured, refined.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

couth (usually uncountable, plural couths)

  1. Social grace, sophistication; manners; refinement.
    That man has no couth.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]