couth

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English couth, doublet of could; from Old English cūþ ‎(known, plain, manifest, certain, well known, usual, noted, excellent, famous, intimate, familiar, friendly, related), from Proto-Germanic *kunþaz ‎(known), from Proto-Indo-European, *ǵneh₃- ‎(to know). Cognate with Scots couth ‎(known, familiar), Saterland Frisian cut ‎(known), Dutch kond ‎(known), German kund ‎(known), Icelandic kuðr, kunnur ‎(known), Gothic 𐌺𐌿𐌽𐌸𐍃 ‎(kunþs, known), Latin gnosco ‎(to know).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

couth ‎(comparative more couth, superlative most couth)

  1. (obsolete) known, renowned

Verb[edit]

couth

  1. (obsolete except in adjective use) past participle of can

Etymology 2[edit]

Back-formation from uncouth.

Adjective[edit]

couth ‎(comparative more couth, superlative most couth)

  1. Marked by or possessing a high degree of sophistication; cultured, refined.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

couth ‎(usually uncountable, plural couths)

  1. Social grace, sophistication; manners; refinement.
    That man has no couth.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]