dretch

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English dretchen, drecchen, drechen, from Old English dreċċan ‎(to vex, irritate, trouble, torment, torture, oppress, afflict), from Proto-Germanic *drakjaną ‎(to torment), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰrag-, *dʰragʰ- ‎(bother, torment). Cognate with Russian раздражать ‎(raz-dražát', to irritate), Sanskrit द्राघते ‎(drāghate, to exert oneself, be tired, torment).

Verb[edit]

dretch ‎(third-person singular simple present dretches, present participle dretching, simple past and past participle dretched)

  1. (transitive) To vex; grill; trouble; oppress.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English dretchen, drecchen, drechen, from Old English *dreċċan ‎(to draw out, delay, linger), from Proto-Germanic *drakjaną ‎(to draw, pull), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰreǵ- ‎(to pull, drag, scratch). Cognate with Scots dratch, dretch ‎(to dawdle), Dutch trekken ‎(to draw, pull, tear, pluck, trek), German trecken ‎(to draw, trek), Danish trække ‎(to draw, pull), Norwegian dråk ‎(stripe), Swedish dialectal drakig ‎(striped, streaked), Icelandic rák ‎(streak).

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

dretch ‎(third-person singular simple present dretches, present participle dretching, simple past and past participle dretched)

  1. (intransitive) To delay; linger; tarry.
  2. (intransitive, Britain dialectal, Scotland) To move slowly and heavily; dawdle; loiter.

Noun[edit]

dretch ‎(plural dretches)

  1. An idle wench; a slattern.
  2. (Britain dialectal, Scotland) A person slow in the execution of a job; a dawdler.