enchanter

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old French enchanteor.

Noun[edit]

enchanter (plural enchanters, feminine enchantress)

  1. One who enchants.
    • 1991, "Critics' Voices" in Time, 11 February, 1991, [1]
      Robert Morse brings back to life the author, wit, bon vivant, self-pitier and true enchanter that was Truman Capote in this Tony-winning one-man performance,
  2. A warlock or sorcerer.
    • 14th C., Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales, The Parson's Tale, section 38, [2]
      But lat us go now to thilke horrible sweryng of adjuracioun and conjuracioun, as doon thise false enchauntours or nigromanciens in bacyns ful of water, or in a bright swerd, in a cercle, or in a fir, or in a shulderboon of a sheep.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, Book One, Indianapolis: Hackett, 2006, Canto VII, stanza 35, p. 113,
      No magicke arts hereof had any might, / Nor bloody wordes of bold Enchaunters call, / But all that was not such, as seemd in sight, / Before that shield did fade, and suddeine fall:
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling, Book XI, Chapter VIII, [3]
      He was indeed as bitter an enemy to the savage authority too often exercised by husbands and fathers, over the young and lovely of the other sex, as ever knight-errant was to the barbarous power of enchanters; nay, to say truth, I have often suspected that those very enchanters with which romance everywhere abounds were in reality no other than the husbands of those days; and matrimony itself was, perhaps, the enchanted castle in which the nymphs were said to be confined.
    • 1820, Percy Bysshe Shelley, "Ode to the West Wind", lines 2-3, [4]
      Thou from whose unseen presence the leaves dead / Are driven like ghosts from an enchanter fleeing,
    • 1949, George Orwell, Nineteen Eighty-Four, Part One, Chapter 1, [5]
      [] Goldstein [] seemed like some sinister enchanter, capable by the mere power of his voice of wrecking the structure of civilization.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French enchanter, probably borrowed from Latin incantāre, present active infinitive of incantō. Doublet of incanter.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

enchanter

  1. (transitive) to enchant

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably borrowed from Latin incantāre, present active infinitive of incantō, from cantus (song; chant). Compare chant, chanter, etc.

Verb[edit]

enchanter

  1. to enchant (to put under the power of an enchantment)

Conjugation[edit]

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-ts, *-tt are modified to z, t. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]