falco

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See also: Falco and falcó

Italian[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Latin falcō.

Noun[edit]

falco m (plural falchi)

  1. hawk, falcon

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Late Latin, of uncertain and disputed origin, but probably from Germanic given the early attestation and widespread use of the word in Germanic. Perhaps from Old High German falco, falcho, falucho (falcon), from Proto-Germanic *falkô (falcon", literally, "grey bird), from Proto-Indo-European *pol-, *pel- (grey, bluish). Cognate with Old Saxon falko (falcon), Old English fealca, fealcen (falcon), Old Norse falki (falcon), Old High German falo (pale), Latin pullus (dusky coloured, blackish). More at fallow.

Alternate etymology connects Late Latin falco to Latin falx (sickle, hook), from Proto-Indo-European *dhalk-, *dhalg- (a cutting tool), but this derivation is usually regarded as folk-etymology due to the bird's curved beak and talons[1].

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

falcō m (genitive falcōnis); third declension

  1. falcon

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative falcō falcōnēs
genitive falcōnis falcōnum
dative falcōnī falcōnibus
accusative falcōnem falcōnēs
ablative falcōne falcōnibus
vocative falcō falcōnēs

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Webster's New World College Dictionary, falcon.

See also[edit]


Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *falkô. See Latin falco.

Noun[edit]

falco m

  1. falcon

Descendants[edit]