favus

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin favus (honeycomb).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfeɪvəs/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪvəs

Noun[edit]

favus

  1. (medicine) A severe, chronic infection of ringworm.
    • 1901 July 19, “Favus in Poultry”, in The Agricultural Journal and Mining Record[1], volume 4, number 10, page 317:
      The first signs of an attack of favus are small, pale, irregular, cup-like spots on the comb or wattles, generally appearing on the comb first.
  2. A tile or flagstone cut into a hexagonal shape to produce a honeycomb pattern.

Translations[edit]

References[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin favus (honeycomb).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

favus m (uncountable)

  1. favus

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

favus (honeycomb)

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *bʰōw- (to swell, grow, thrive, be, live, dwell). Related to English build.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

favus m (genitive favī); second declension

  1. honeycomb
    • 4th-century CE, Jerome of Stridon (St. Jerome), Vulgate, 24:13:
      comede fīlī mī mel quia bonum est et favum dulcissimum gutturī tuō
      Eat honey, my son, because it is good, and the honeycomb most sweet to thy throat.
      (trans. Douay-Rheims Bible)
    • 8 CE, Ovid, Fasti 3.745-746:
      ut satyrī levisque senex tetigēre sapōrem,
      quaerēbant flāvōs per nemus omne favōs
      Since the satyrs and the bald-headed old man [Silenus] had tasted its flavor,
      they were searching for the golden yellow honeycombs through all the grove.

      (Note the poetic word play in the consonance and assonance of ‘‘flāvōs favōs.’’ For more honeyed mythology, see Liber, Dionysus, Silenus, and The Discovery of Honey by Bacchus.)
  1. a hexagonal pavement stone

Declension[edit]

Second-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative favus favī
Genitive favī favōrum
Dative favō favīs
Accusative favum favōs
Ablative favō favīs
Vocative fave favī

Descendants[edit]

  • English: favus
  • Esperanto: favo (ringworm, scurf)
  • French: favus
  • Galician: favo
  • Italian: favo

References[edit]

  • favus”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • favus”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • favus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French favus.

Noun[edit]

favus n (plural favusuri)

  1. favus

Declension[edit]