fiacre

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French fiacre. From Hôtel de Saint Fiacre, a tavern in Paris operating a horse-carriage service from the 1640s, itself named after the Irish Saint Fiacre (c. 600–670 CE), perhaps from Irish fiach (raven).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /fɪˈɑːkɹə/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

fiacre (plural fiacres)

  1. (historical) A small horse-drawn carriage for hire; a hackney carriage.
    • 1766, T[obias] Smollett, Travels through France and Italy. [], volume I, London: [] R[oberts] Baldwin, [], OCLC 733048407, page 94:
      On the road to Choissi, a fiacre, or hackney-coach, stopped, and out came five or six men, armed with musquets, who took post, each behind a separate tree.
    • 1903, Henry James, The Ambassadors[1]:
      Poor Jim, with his arms folded and his little legs out in the open fiacre, drank in the sparkling Paris noon and carried his eyes from one side of their vista to the other.
    • 1942, Rebecca West, Black Lamb and Grey Falcon (Canongate 2006, p. 633)
      The boy who might have fetched us a fiacre was now doing something else, so we had to go back to the station, and there we found only one, which was falling to pieces.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

See fiacre.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fiacre m (plural fiacres)

  1. fiacre

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French fiacre.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fiacre m (plural fiacri)

  1. fiacre

References[edit]

  1. ^ fiacre in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)
  2. ^ fiacre in Dizionario Italiano Olivetti, Olivetti Media Communication

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

fiacre m (plural fiacres)

  1. fiacre (small carriage for hire)