germe

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See also: germé

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin germen.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ʒɛʁm/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

germe m (plural germes)

  1. germ (small mass of cells)
  2. seed
  3. bulb (of onion, garlic etc.)
  4. (figuratively) seed (the principle cause)

Verb[edit]

germe

  1. first-person singular present indicative of germer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of germer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of germer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of germer
  5. second-person singular imperative of germer

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin germen (seed; origin), from Proto-Italic *genamen, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵénh₁mn̥ (offspring, seed), derived from the root *ǵenh₁- (to give birth, to beget).
Cognate with Irish giniúint (procreation, birth).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈd͡ʒɛr.me/
  • Rhymes: -ɛrme
  • Hyphenation: gèr‧me

Noun[edit]

germe m (plural germi)

  1. (biology) germ
  2. (literary) seed, sprout
    • 1822, Alessandro Manzoni, “La Pentecoste [The Pentecost]”, in Inni sacri [Sacred Hymns]‎[1], collected in Opere varie di Alessandro Manzoni, Fratelli Rechiedei, lines 101–104, page 678:
      I doni tuoi benefica ¶ Nutra la tua virtude; ¶ Siccome il sol che schiude ¶ Dal pigro germe il fior
      May your benevolent virtue nourish your gifts, like the sun that opens the flower from the lazy sprout
  3. (figuratively) seed, beginning, origin
    • (Can we date this quote?), Niccolò Tommaseo, Dolore e speranza [Sorrow and Hope], collected in Poesie di Niccolò Tommaseo, Successori Le Monnier, lines 21–24, page 196:
      Senz'affanni non germoglia ¶ Dell'onore il germe santo ¶ Seminai, Signor, nel pianto; ¶ Nella gioia mieterò.
      The holy seed of honor blossoms not without trials. I sowed, o Lord, in weeping; I shall reap in joy.
  4. (figuratively, archaic) son, offspring
    • 16th century, Annibale Caro, transl., Eneide [Aeneid]‎[2], Florence: Leonardo Ciardetti, translation of Aeneis by Virgil, published 1827, Libro VI, page 270:
      [] la Sibilla ¶ A dir riprese: Enea, germe del cielo, ¶ Lo scender ne l'Averno è cosa agevole; ¶ Chè notte e dì ne sta l'entrata aperta
      the sibyl continued, "O Aeneas, son of the heavens, descending into the Avernus is easy, for its entrance is open night and day
  5. (figuratively, archaic, rare) lineage, progeny

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin germen.

Noun[edit]

germe m (plural germes)

  1. seed (fertilized grain)

Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • gérmen (rare in the sense of microorganism, otherwise common)

Etymology[edit]

From Latin germen (bud, seed, embryo), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵenh₁- (to bear) + *-mn̥.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

germe m (plural germes)

  1. germ (embryo of a seed)
    Synonym: embrião
  2. germ; microorganism
    Synonyms: microorganismo, micróbio
  3. germ (idea that forms the basis of some project)
    Synonyms: origem, ideia

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]