glossa

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the Ancient Greek γλῶσσᾰ (glôssa, tongue). Doublet of gloss.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

glossa (plural glossae or glossas)

  1. (zoology) The tongue, or lingua, especially of an insect.
    • 2016, Dr. Jol, Suburban Brand, Charlotte Publishing Press, →ISBN:
      They wished to see what Holy would do with the glossa. “The innocent will tell no lies.” The organ eventually had been divided into nineteen sections, distributed, and ingested. “We swallow your lies and cause them to build our powers.”
    • 2016, Dr. JD Philip, “The Wedding”, in Victoria: A Pirate Romance, Charlotte Publishing Press, →ISBN, page 230:
      Her swollen “button” hitting his glossa tip provided wave after wave of full body pleasure.
    • 2018, Gloria Trubbshore, Băṭluptă, Xlibris, →ISBN:
      It was his glossa, strange that; when dead men had no need to verbalize.
    • 2019, Harald W. Krenn, Insect Mouthparts: Form, Function, Development and Performance, page 452:
      In the Paragiina, the proximal region of the glossa is elongated, and the paraglossae are long and reach the bifid apex of the glossa.
  2. (phonology) Unintelligible ecstatic speech.
    • 1968, William J. Samarin, The Linguiticality of Glossolalia, page 64:
      This pattern does not hold in the glossas we have examined: [th] occurs where we expect [], as in the “word” kita in our sample text, and [] occurs freely in other American glossas as an independent sound unit, []
    • 1975, Temenos, page 50:
      I have analysed a total of 24 prophetic glossas in this way, and 10 passages of the more easily intelligible prayer specimens of glossolalia. These glossas emanate from a total of 15 persons.
    • 1976, Linguistics, page 87:
      Although Samarin has examples of glossas from people who are not adherents to Christianity he does feel that occurences[sic] of glossolalia apart from Christian influences are rare.
    • 2008, B. Ward Powers, “Excursus 4: Tongues-Speaking Today: A Comment”, in First Corinthians: An Exegetical and Explanatory Commentary; A Consideration of Some Views Ancient and Modern in the Light of a Verse-by-Verse Look at What the Text Actually Says; A Somewhat Traditional Interpretation Plus Contemporary Application, Eugene, Ore.: Wipf and Stock, →ISBN, page 409:
      Thus significant differences exist between the glossas of different individuals: indeed, one person may have more than one distinctive glossa. And there are differences between the glossas of people of different linguistic backgrounds which correspond with the differences between their mother tongues, allowing for the influence of other languages which they may know to some extent.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin glossa.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

glossa f (plural glosses)

  1. gloss (explanatory note)
  2. comment, annotation
    Synonym: comentari

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin glossa. Doublet of chiosa.

Noun[edit]

glossa f (plural glosse)

  1. gloss (explanatory note)
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

glossa

  1. inflection of glossare:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Anagrams[edit]


Italiot Greek[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek γλῶσσα (glôssa).

Noun[edit]

glossa f

  1. tongue

Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek γλῶσσᾰ (glôssa).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

glōssa f (genitive glōssae); first declension

  1. an obsolete, foreign, rare, or otherwise obscure or difficult term that requires explanation
    • (Can we find and add a quotation of Ausonius to this entry?)
    • circa AD 95, Marcus Fabius Quintilianus (author), Harold Edgeworth Butler (editor, translator), Institutio Oratoria (1920), book I, chapter i, § 35:
      protinus enim potest interpretationem linguae secretioris, quas Graeci γλώσσας vocant, dum aliud agitur, ediscere et inter prima elementa consequi rem postea proprium tempus desideraturam. et quoniam circa res adhuc tenues moramur, ii quoque versus, qui ad imitationem scribendi proponentur, non otiosas velim sententias habeant sed honestum aliquid monentes.
      He can readily learn the explanations or glosses, as the Greeks call them, of the more obscure words by the way and, while he is still engaged on the first rudiments, acquire what would otherwise demand special time to be devoted to it. And as we are still discussing minor details, I would urge that the lines, which he is set to copy, should not express thoughts of no significance, but convey some sound moral lesson. ― translation from the same source
    Synonym: glossēma
    1. (Late Latin) an explanation or interpretation of such a word
      • (Can we find and add a quotation of Isidore of Seville to this entry?)
      Synonym: interpretātiō
    2. (Medieval Latin) an explanation added to a passage of text, a gloss
  2. (in the plural, as glossae) a term applied to collections of such words with explanations, a glossary
    • (Can we find and add a quotation of Marcus Terentius Varro to this entry?)
    Synonyms: glossārium, glossātūra, glossēmata
    1. (Medieval Latin) a series of glosses assembled into a commentary
  3. (Medieval Latin) a language, dialect, or peculiar idiom
    Synonyms: idiōma, lingua
  4. (Medieval Latin) an image or example (of a thing)
    Synonyms: exemplum, imāgō

Usage notes[edit]

  • This word is written in untransliterated Greek in some Classical sources.

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative glōssa glōssae
Genitive glōssae glōssārum
Dative glōssae glōssīs
Accusative glōssam glōssās
Ablative glōssā glōssīs
Vocative glōssa glōssae

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • glossa”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • 1. GLOSSA in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • 2. GLOSSA in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • glossa in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette, page 716/2
  • glossa”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • glossa” on page 767/3 of the Oxford Latin Dictionary (1st ed., 1968–82)
  • Niermeyer, Jan Frederik (1976), “glossa”, in Mediae Latinitatis Lexicon Minus, Leiden, Boston: E. J. Brill, page 470/2