gourmand

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English gourmaunt, gormond, gromonde, from Old French gormant (a glutton, noun), from gormant (gluttonous, adjective), of uncertain origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɡʊə.mənd/, /ˈɡʊʁmɑ̃/
    • (file)
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɡɔɹˈmɑnd/, /ˈɡʊɹ.mɑnd/

Noun[edit]

gourmand (plural gourmands)

  1. A person given to excess in the consumption of food and drink; a greedy or ravenous eater.
    • 1616, Benjamin Jonson [i.e., Ben Jonson], “Seianvs his Fall. []”, in The Workes of Ben Jonson (First Folio), London: [] Will[iam] Stansby, OCLC 960101342, Act I, page 365:
      I knew him, at Caivs trencher, when for hyre, / He proſtituted his abuſed body / To that great gourmond, fat Apicivs;
    • 1908, W[illiam] B[lair] M[orton] Ferguson, chapter I, in Zollenstein, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 731476803, page 5:
      The colonel and his sponsor made a queer contrast: Greystone [the sponsor] long and stringy, with a face that seemed as if a cold wind was eternally playing on it. [] But there was not a more lascivious reprobate and gourmand in all London than this same Greystone.
  2. A person who appreciates good food.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French gourmant (glutton), originally an adjectival form, from Old French, where it had the sense of trencherman, but of uncertain ultimate origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gourmand (feminine singular gourmande, masculine plural gourmands, feminine plural gourmandes)

  1. eating a lot
  2. (more recently) having a love for good food, demanding of food quality

Noun[edit]

gourmand m (plural gourmands, feminine gourmande)

  1. a person who eats a lot, or who has refined tastes in food

Usage notes[edit]

The French and English usages of this word are false friends. While the English word has evolved to emphasize the excesses of a gourmand, the French word has become more associated with refined tastes in food. See also gourmet, which has considerable overlap with this word.

Descendants[edit]

  • Czech: gurmán
  • Portuguese: gourmand

Further reading[edit]


Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French, where it had the sense of trencherman, but of uncertain ultimate origin

Adjective[edit]

gourmand m

  1. (Jersey) greedy

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French gourmand.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gourmand m, f (plural gourmands)

  1. gourmand (person who appreciates good food)
  2. gourmand (person who eats too much)
    Synonym: comilão

Further reading[edit]

  • gourmand” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.