impetuous

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English, from Old French impetueux, from Late Latin impetuōsus (violent), from Latin impetus (attack, violence).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

impetuous (comparative more impetuous, superlative most impetuous)

  1. Making arbitrary decisions, especially in an impulsive and forceful manner.
    • 1880, John Weeks Moore, Complete Encyclopaedia of Music, "Beethoven, Louis Van":
      But it was natural, that the impetuous, restless young artist should incline more to excess of strength than of delicacy in his playing.
  2. Characterized by sudden violence or vehemence.
    • 1794, Ann Radcliffe, The Mysteries of Udolpho, vol. II, chapter I:
      He stands, and views in the faint rays
      Far, far below, the torrent's rising surge,
      And listens to the wild impetuous roar
    • 1813, Jane Austen, chapter 4, in Pride and Prejudice, volume III:
      "Oh! where, where is my uncle?" cried Elizabeth, darting from her seat as she finished the letter, in eagerness to follow him, with-out losing a moment of the time so precious; but as she reached the door, it was opened by a servant, and Mr. Darcy appeared. Her pale face and impetuous manner made him start []

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

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