impostor

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French imposteur.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

impostor (plural impostors)

  1. Someone who attempts to deceive by using an assumed name or identity.
    • 1837, L[etitia] E[lizabeth] L[andon], Ethel Churchill: Or, The Two Brides. [], volume I, London: Henry Colburn, [], OCLC 21345056, page 153:
      "It were dishonour in me to yield. I will not play the part of an impostor, whom my uncle must despise even while he screens. No; these estates are his right: let him take them; I will not buy them with his daughter's hand."
    • 1960, P[elham] G[renville] Wodehouse, chapter XX, in Jeeves in the Offing, London: Herbert Jenkins, OCLC 1227855:
      “I said he had a criminal face.” “He can't help his face.” “He can help being a crook and an impostor. Calls himself a butler, does he? The police could shake that story. He's no more a butler than I am.”
  2. (computer graphics) A sprite or animation integrated into a three-dimensional scene, but not based on an actual 3D model.

Synonyms[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin impostor.

Noun[edit]

impostor m (plural impostors, feminine impostora)

  1. impostor (someone who uses a false identity)

Further reading[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin impostor.

Noun[edit]

impostor m (plural impostores, feminine impostora, feminine plural impostoras)

  1. impostor (someone who uses a false identity)

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From earlier impositor, agent noun of impōnō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

impostor m (genitive impostōris); third declension

  1. (Late Latin) impostor
    • 2022, The Chalkeaters (lyrics and music), “A SONGUS AMONGUS”‎[1], performed by Gabriel Brown:
      Credo in amogum et impostores suspectos / Quo fugiam ab eorum spiritibus.
      I believe in amogus and suspicious impostors / So that I may escape from their spirits.

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative impostor impostōrēs
Genitive impostōris impostōrum
Dative impostōrī impostōribus
Accusative impostōrem impostōrēs
Ablative impostōre impostōribus
Vocative impostor impostōrēs

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Polish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Late Latin impostor. Doublet of imposter.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /imˈpɔs.tɔr/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔstɔr
  • Syllabification: im‧pos‧tor

Noun[edit]

impostor m pers

  1. (dated) impostor (someone who uses a false identity)
    Hypernym: oszust

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • impostor in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • impostor in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Late Latin impostōrem.

Noun[edit]

impostor m (plural impostores, feminine impostora, feminine plural impostoras)

  1. impostor (someone who uses a false identity)

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • impostor” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French imposteur.

Noun[edit]

impostor m (plural impostori)

  1. impostor

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Late Latin impostor. Cognate with English impostor.

Noun[edit]

impostor m (plural impostores, feminine impostora, feminine plural impostoras)

  1. impostor (someone who uses a false identity)

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]