larder

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Middle English larder, from Anglo-Norman larder and Old French lardier, from Latin lardārium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

larder (plural larders)

  1. A cool room in a domestic house where food is stored, but larger than a pantry.
    • 1907, E.M. Forster, The Longest Journey, Part II, XVI [Uniform ed., p. 169]:
      He had always intended to marry when he could afford it; and once he had been in love, violently in love, but had laid the passion aside, and told it to wait till a more convenient season. … But when, after the lapse of fifteen years, he went, as it were, to his spiritual larder and took down Love from the top shelf to offer him to Mrs. Orr, he was rather dismayed.
  2. A food supply.
    • 1990, Stephen B. Vander Wall, Food Hoarding in Animals (page 243)
      Many of these cones had opened, and nuthatches visited the tree frequently to take seeds from the squirrel's larder.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Verb[edit]

larder

  1. to lard; to smear food with lard
  2. to stab; to pierce

Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman larder and continental Old French lardier, both from Latin lardārium; equivalent to lard +‎ -er.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /larˈdeːr/, /ˈlardər/

Noun[edit]

larder

  1. A stock of meat (originally cured pork)
  2. The place where such a stock is made and stored.
  3. (figuratively) Bloodshed, killing.

Descendants[edit]

  • English: larder
  • Middle Scots: lairder

References[edit]