magnoperate

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

PIE word
*méǵh₂s

From Latin magnopere (exceedingly, greatly; earnestly, vehemently) + English -ate (suffix forming verbs with the sense ‘to act in the specified manner’), modelled after operate.[1][2] Magnopere is derived from magnō opere (with great labour; exceedingly, greatly), from magnō (the ablative masculine or neuter singular of magnus (big, large; (figuratively) great, important), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *méǵh₂s (big, great)) + opere (the ablative singular of opus (accomplishment, work; work (of art, literature, etc.)), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₃ep- (to toil, work; to make; ability; force)).

Verb[edit]

magnoperate (third-person singular simple present magnoperates, present participle magnoperating, simple past and past participle magnoperated) (rare)

  1. (transitive) To magnify the greatness of (someone or something); to exalt.
    • 1610, Arthur Hopton, “To the Right Honovrable, Robert Earle of Salisbvry, [...]”, in Bacvlvm Geodæticvm, sive Viaticvm. Or The Geodeticall Staffe, [], London: [] Nicholas Okes for Simon Waterson, [], OCLC 926194352:
      [A]fter-ages may rightly admire what noble Mecœnas it was that ſo inchayned the aſpiring wits of this vnderſtanding age to his only cenſure, which will not a little magnoperate the ſplendor of your well knowne Honour, to theſe ſucceeding times.
  2. (intransitive) To act grandly.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From magnum opus +‎ -ate (suffix forming verbs with the sense ‘to act in the specified manner’), in this sense coined by the English poet Lord Byron (1788–1824): see the 1821 quotation.[1] Magnum opus is derived from Latin magnum opus, from magnum (the accusative neuter singular of magnus (big, large; (figuratively) great, important)) + opus (accomplishment, work; work (of art, literature, etc.)); see further at etymology 1.

Verb[edit]

magnoperate (third-person singular simple present magnoperates, present participle magnoperating, simple past and past participle magnoperated)

  1. (intransitive, rare) To work on one's magnum opus (great or important work of art, literature, or music, a masterpiece; best, most popular, or most renowned achievement of an artist or author, representing their major life effort).
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 magnoperate, v.”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, September 2019.
  2. ^ magnoperate, v.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.

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