margrave

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See also: márgrave

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch marcgrāve (modern Dutch markgraaf), cognate with Old High German marcgrāvo (modern German Markgraf), from the Germanic bases of mark (march, border territory) + grave (officer of comital rank). Compare marchion, marquis, landgrave.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

margrave (plural margraves)

  1. A feudal era military-administrative officer of comital rank in the Carolingian empire and some successor states, originally in charge of a border area.
    • 1973: Among pulverised heads of stone margraves and electors, reconnoitering a likely-looking cabbage patch, all of a sudden Slothrop picks up the scent of an unmistakable no it can’t be yes it is it’s a REEFER! — Thomas Pynchon, Gravity’s Rainbow
  2. A hereditary ruling prince in certain feudal states of the Holy Roman Empire and elsewhere; the titular equivalent became known as marquis or marquess.
    • 1516: The Margrave of Bruges was their head. — Thomas More, Utopia, Chapter 1.

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Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

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French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch marcgrāve (modern Dutch markgraaf).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

margrave m (plural margraves)

  1. A margrave

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

margrave f (plural margraves)

  1. margravine

Synonyms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Markgraf.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

margrave m (plural margraves)

  1. A margrave