mendicant

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mendīcāns, present participle of mendīcō (beg). Compare French mendiant.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈmɛn.dɪ.kənt/
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

mendicant (not comparable)

  1. Depending on alms for a living.
  2. Of or pertaining to a beggar.
  3. Of or pertaining to a member of a religious order forbidden to own property, and who must beg for a living.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

mendicant (plural mendicants)

  1. A pauper who lives by begging.
    • 1856 May, Thomas Hughes, quoting Charles Kingsley, “Prefatory Memoir”, in Charles Kingsley, Alton Locke, Tailor and Poet. [], London: Macmillan and Co., published 1876, OCLC 1079188784, page lvi:
      I made £150 by Alton Locke, and never lost a farthing; and I got, not in spite of, but by the rows, a name and a standing with many a one who would never have heard of me otherwise, and I should have been a stercoraceous mendicant if I had hollowed when I got a facer, while I was winning by the cross, though I didn't mean to fight one.
  2. A religious friar, forbidden to own personal property, who begs for a living.

Translations[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

mendīcant

  1. third-person plural present active indicative of mendīcō