mook

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: mõõk and Mook

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Unknown. Perhaps a variant of moke (“donkey” in British slang), in the US also attested with the sense “black man”. Alternatively from Irish muc (pig) or perhaps Dutch mok, German Mocke, Mucke (both dialectal for “sow” and hence “slovenly or bothersome woman/person”), themselves likely from the Celtic. Finally, it could be a corruption of Italian mammalucco (fool, literally mamluk).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mook (plural mooks)

  1. (slang, US, chiefly Upper Midwest, Mid-Atlantic, and New England) A disagreeable or incompetent person.
  2. (colloquial, gaming) An anonymous foe that appears in large numbers and is readily dispatched by the hero.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Blend of magazine +‎ book, nowadays a reborrowing from Japanese ムック (mukku).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mook (plural mooks)

  1. A book published in the form factor of a magazine.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cannon, Garland (2000) The Innovative Attraction of English[1], Associated University Presses, →ISBN, page 237

Totontepec Mixe[edit]

Noun[edit]

mook

  1. cob, corn.