mook

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See also: mõõk and Mook

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From the 1930s, origin unknown. Suggestions include a variant of British slang moke (donkey);[1] a variant of US slang mooch (a sponger, beggar, idler);[2] Irish muc (pig); Dutch mok, German Mocke, Mucke (both dialectal for “sow” and hence “slovenly or bothersome woman/person”); a corruption of Italian mammalucco (fool, literally mamluk).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mook (plural mooks)

  1. (slang, US, chiefly Northeastern US, Upper Midwestern US) A disagreeable or incompetent person.[3]
  2. (colloquial, gaming) An anonymous foe that appears in large numbers and is readily dispatched by the hero.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ J.E. Lighter, Random House Dictionary of American Slang, vol. II, 1987.
  2. ^ Jonathon Green Green's Dictionary of Slang https://greensdictofslang.com/entry/jslxr4y
  3. ^ Killing the Mook and Midriff

Etymology 2[edit]

Blend of magazine +‎ book, nowadays a reborrowing from Japanese ムック (mukku).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mook (plural mooks)

  1. A book published in the form factor of a magazine.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cannon, Garland (2000) The Innovative Attraction of English[1], Associated University Presses, →ISBN, page 237

Anagrams[edit]

Tagalog[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: mo‧ok
  • IPA(key): /moˈʔok/, [moˈʔok]

Noun[edit]

moók (Baybayin spelling ᜋᜓᜂᜃ᜔)

  1. fierce fighting; hand-to-hand battle

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • mook”, in Pambansang Diksiyonaryo | Diksiyonaryo.ph, Manila, 2018

Totontepec Mixe[edit]

Noun[edit]

mook

  1. cob, corn.