pietas

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See also: pietàs

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *pwījotāts. Equivalent to pius (pious, devout) +‎ -tās (-ty, -dom).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pietās f (genitive pietātis); third declension

  1. dutiful conduct, sense of duty
  2. (to the gods) piety, conscientiousness, scrupulousness
  3. (to one's parents, children, relatives, country, benefactors, etc.) duty, dutifulness, affection, love, loyalty, patriotism, gratitude
  4. gentleness, kindness, tenderness, pity, compassion
    Synonyms: misericordia, eleēmosyna
    Antonyms: ferōcitās, crūdēlitās, feritās, sevēritās

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative pietās pietātēs
Genitive pietātis pietātum
Dative pietātī pietātibus
Accusative pietātem pietātēs
Ablative pietāte pietātibus
Vocative pietās pietātēs

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: piety, pity
  • Friulian: pietât
  • Italian: pietà

References[edit]

  • pietas”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • pietas”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • pietas in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • pietas in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • pietas”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • pietas”, in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray