pinguis

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Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *peyH- (fat), maybe contaminated by *bʰenǵʰ- (fat, thick). Cognate with German feist (fat, plump, obese). Related also to Dutch vet (fat), German fett (fat, corpulent), English fat, Icelandic feitur (fat).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈpin.ɡʷis/, [ˈpɪŋɡʷɪs̠]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈpin.ɡwis/, [ˈpiŋɡwis]
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

pinguis (neuter pingue, superlative pinguissimus); third-declension two-termination adjective

  1. fat, plump
  2. thick, dense
  3. (of taste) dull, insipid, not pungent
  4. (of wine) oily, rich, full-bodied
  5. (of land) fertile, rich
  6. (figuratively, of the mind) heavy, dull, stupid, obtuse
  7. (figuratively) bold, strong
  8. (figuratively) quiet, comfortable, easy
  9. (phonology) of the sound l, velarized (cf. dark l)
    Antonym: exīlis

Declension[edit]

Third-declension two-termination adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
Nominative pinguis pingue pinguēs pinguia
Genitive pinguis pinguium
Dative pinguī pinguibus
Accusative pinguem pingue pinguēs
pinguīs
pinguia
Ablative pinguī pinguibus
Vocative pinguis pingue pinguēs pinguia

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • >? English: penguin
  • English: pinguid
  • Italian: pingue
  • Romansch: paintg
  • Spanish: pingüe

References[edit]

  • pinguis in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • pinguis in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • pinguis in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • with no intelligence or skill: crassa or pingui Minerva (proverb.)