plump

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /plʌmp/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌmp

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English plump, plompe, a borrowing from Middle Dutch plomp or Middle Low German plump.

Adjective[edit]

plump (comparative plumper or more plump, superlative plumpest or most plump)

  1. Having a full and rounded shape; chubby, somewhat overweight.
    a plump baby; plump cheeks
    • 1651, Thomas Carew, To my friend G. N. from Wrest
      The god of wine did his plump clusters bring.
    • 2015, Anton Chekhov, The Life and Genius of Anton Chekhov: Letters, Diary, Reminiscences and Biography: Assorted Collection of Autobiographical Writings of the Renowned Russian Author and Playwright of Uncle Vanya, The Cherry Orchard, The Three Sisters and The Seagull, e-artnow (→ISBN)
      My ideal is to be idle and to love a plump girl.
    • 1956, Delano Ames, chapter 23, in Crime out of Mind:
      He was a plump little man and we had been walking uphill at a pace—set by him—far too rapid for his short legs. He breathed stertorously, and half the drops which glimmered on his rotund face were not rain but sweat.
  2. Fat.
  3. Sudden and without reservation; blunt; direct; downright.
    • 1898, George Saintsbury, A Short History of English Literature
      After the plump statement that the author was at Erceldoune and spake with Thomas.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

plump (third-person singular simple present plumps, present participle plumping, simple past and past participle plumped)

  1. (intransitive) To grow plump; to swell out.
    Her cheeks have plumped.
  2. (transitive) To make plump; to fill (out) or support; often with up.
    to plump oysters or scallops by placing them in fresh or brackish water
    • 1655, Thomas Fuller, Church-History of Britain
      to plump up the hollowness of their history with improbable miracles
  3. (transitive) To cast or let drop all at once, suddenly and heavily.
    to plump a stone into water
    • 1859, Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities
      Although Miss Pross, through her long association with a French family, might have known as much of their language as of her own, if she had had a mind, she had no mind in that direction [] So her manner of marketing was to plump a noun-substantive at the head of a shopkeeper without any introduction in the nature of an article []
  4. (intransitive) To give a plumper (kind of vote).
  5. (transitive) To give (a vote), as a plumper.
  6. (transitive with for) To favor or decide in favor of something.
    • 2014, “Brazil in a nutshell”, in The Economist:
      A recent poll by the New York Times found that although most Brazilians plump for arch-rival Argentina as the team they most want to lose, the second-biggest group want Brazil itself to stumble.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English plumpen, akin to Middle Dutch plompen, Middle Low German plumpen, German plumpfen.

Verb[edit]

plump (third-person singular simple present plumps, present participle plumping, simple past and past participle plumped)

  1. (intransitive) To drop or fall suddenly or heavily, all at once.
    • September 24, 1712, The Spectator No. 492, letter from a prude
      Dulcissa plumps into a chair.

Translations[edit]

Adverb[edit]

plump

  1. Directly; suddenly; perpendicularly.

Noun[edit]

plump (plural plumps)

  1. The sound of a sudden heavy fall.
    • 1863, Sheridan Le Fanu, The House by the Churchyard:
      As she beheld her, poor Mrs. Mack's heart fluttered up to her mouth, and then dropped with a dreadful plump, into the pit of her stomach.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English plump.

Noun[edit]

plump (plural plumps)

  1. (obsolete) A knot or cluster; a group; a crowd.
    a plump of trees, fowls, or spears

References[edit]


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

plump (comparative plumper, superlative am plumpesten)

  1. crude, clumsy
  2. squat, stumpy

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Onomatopoeic

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

plump f (genitive singular plumpa, nominative plural plumpanna)

  1. Cois Fharraige form of plimp

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
plump phlump bplump
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

plump

  1. big and awkward
  2. base, vulgar