blot

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See also: blod, bløt, blöt, blöd, blóð, and blöð

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Originally "blemish," perhaps from Old Norse blettr, or from Old French bloche (clod of earth)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

blot (plural blots)

  1. A blemish, spot or stain made by a coloured substance.
    • Shakespeare
      inky blots
  2. (by extension) A stain on someone's reputation or character; a disgrace.
    • Shakespeare
      This deadly blot in thy digressing son.
  3. (biochemistry) The Southern blot analysis (and derived Northern and Western) analytical techniques.
  4. (backgammon) an exposed piece in backgammon.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

blot (third-person singular simple present blots, present participle blotting, simple past and past participle blotted)

  1. (transitive) to cause a blot (on something) by spilling a coloured substance.
  2. (intransitive) to soak up or absorb liquid.
    This paper blots easily.
  3. (transitive) To dry (writing, etc.) with blotting paper.
  4. (transitive) To spot, stain, or bespatter, as with ink.
    • Gascoigne
      The briefe was writte and blotted all with gore.
  5. (transitive) To impair; to damage; to mar; to soil.
    • Shakespeare
      It blots thy beauty, as frosts do bite the meads.
  6. (transitive) To stain with infamy; to disgrace.
    • Rowe
      Blot not thy innocence with guiltless blood.
  7. (transitive) To obliterate, as writing with ink; to cancel; to efface; generally with out.
    to blot out a word or a sentence
    • Dryden
      One act like this blots out a thousand crimes.
  8. (transitive) To obscure; to eclipse; to shadow.
    • Cowley
      He sung how earth blots the moon's gilded wane.

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *blōtą.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

blōt n

  1. a sacrifice, especially a blood sacrifice by heathens.
    He ealle ða cuman to blote gedyde: he gave all the strangers as a sacrifice. (Alfred's Orosius)