roca

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Roca and roça

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

roca f (plural roques)

  1. rock

See also[edit]


Galician[edit]

Woman holding a roca ("distaff") and a fuso ("spindle")

Etymology 1[edit]

From Gothic rukka, 𐍂𐌿𐌺𐌺𐌰 (rukka), from Proto-Germanic *rukkô, related to Old High German rocko.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

roca f (plural rocas)

  1. spinning distaff (part of a spinning wheel from which fibre is drawn to be spun)
    En cada terra seu uso, en cada roca seu fuso.
    In every country its customs, for every distaff its spindle.
    (proverb)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese roca (13th century, Cantigas de Santa Maria) from Medieval Latin rocca, from Vulgar Latin *rocca, of unknown origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

roca f (plural rocas)

  1. rock
    Synonyms: pena, penedo
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]



Irish[edit]

Verb[edit]

roca

  1. present subjunctive analytic of roc

Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

roca

  1. feminine singular of roco

Anagrams[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Gothic rukka, 𐍂𐌿𐌺𐌺𐌰 (rukka), from Proto-Germanic *rukkô, related to Old High German rocko.[1]

Noun[edit]

roca f (plural rocas)

  1. (spinning) distaff (part of a spinning wheel from which fibre is drawn to be spun)

Etymology 2[edit]

See rocha

Noun[edit]

roca f (plural rocas)

  1. seacliff (cliff by the sea)
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

roca

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of rocar
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of rocar

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mallory, J. P.; Adams, D. Q., editors (1997) Encyclopedia of Indo-European culture, London, Chicago: Fitzroy Dearborn Publishers, page 110

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Medieval Latin rocca, from Vulgar Latin *rocca, of uncertain origin, probably Celtic and most likely pre-Roman substrate.

Cognate with Italian rocca, English rock, French roche, and Breton r'och.

Noun[edit]

roca f (plural rocas)

  1. rock.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]