ruche

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: ruché

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French ruche, from Middle French rusche, from Medieval Latin rusca (bark), from Gaulish *ruskā, from Proto-Celtic *rūskos (bark). Compare Breton rusk, Irish rúsc, Welsh rhisgl and Catalan rusc.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɹuʃ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uʃ

Noun[edit]

ruche (plural ruches)

  1. A strip of fabric which has been fluted or pleated.
  2. A small ruff of fluted or pleated fabric worn at neck or wrist.
    • 1903, Henry James, The Ambassadors:
      Mrs. Newsome wore at operatic hours a black silk dress—very handsome, he knew it was "handsome"—and an ornament that his memory was able further to identify as a ruche.
  3. A pile of arched tiles, used to catch and retain oyster spawn.

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

ruche (third-person singular simple present ruches, present participle ruching, simple past and past participle ruched)

  1. To flute or pleat (fabric).
    ruched curtains
    • 1864, Frank Leslie's Lady's Magazine:
      At each seam the dress opens to a-point over a silk petticoat. The skirt is ruched around the bottom and the openings, between which are bows of ribbon and lace.
    • 1899, The Country Gentleman, page 337:
      This will consist in large part of a half-dozen inexpensive flowered organdies, which she has picked up at various sales for from ten to twenty cents a yard. She has had all of them made with low waists, ruffled or ruched around the corsage, ...
    • 1984, Natalie Rothstein, Madeleine Ginsburg, Avril Hart, Four hundred years of fashion, page 138:
      The matching skirt consists of a drape of pink figured silk, tucked up at the hips to show tiers of machine-made lace frills and pleats [] It is ruched in front and has a train box-pleated into the back.
  2. To bunch up (fabric); to ruck up.
    • 2014, Harriet Evans, Not Without You, Simon and Schuster (→ISBN), page 47:
      Joe Baxter pulled the dress farther down, so it was ruched around my middle, the bottom half pulled up to my stomach.
    • 2017, Laura Trentham, An Indecent Invitation: Spies and Lovers Book 1, Laura Huskins (→ISBN):
      A woman with an agonized expression on her up-turned face sat with her knees apart while a man buried his head between her legs. Her dress was ruched around her waist, and her breasts were bared. Gilmore's scandalous, erotic art.
    • 2018, Raquel Byrnes, Tremblers, Pelican Ventures Book Group (→ISBN):
      Clad in a leather bodice and black skirts ruched up past her knees, the wild-haired rescuer pushed a pair of brass goggles up onto her mop of red locks and squinted. “Well, this is a fine mess,” she said.

See also[edit]

  • ruck (to crease)
  • rutch (to slide)

Central Franconian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German rūchen, from Old High German *rūhhan, northern variant of riohhan.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ruche (third-person singular present rüch, past tense roch, past participle jeroche)

  1. (Ripuarian, transitive or intransitive) to smell

French[edit]

des ruches (1)
des ruches décoratives (2)

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French rusche, from Medieval Latin rusca (bark), from Gaulish *ruskā, from Proto-Celtic *rūskos (bark).

Compare Breton rusk, Irish rúsc, Welsh rhisgl and Catalan rusc.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ruche f (plural ruches)

  1. hive, beehive
  2. (textiles, fashion) ruffle; flounce; ruche

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: ruche
  • German: Rüsche
  • Italian: ruche

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French ruche, from Middle French rusche, from Medieval Latin rusca (bark), from Gaulish *ruskā, from Proto-Celtic *rūskos (bark).

Compare Breton rusk, Irish rúsc, Welsh rhisgl and Catalan rusc.

Noun[edit]

ruche f (invariable)

  1. ruche

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French rusche, from Medieval Latin rusca (bark), from Gaulish *ruskā, from Proto-Celtic *rūsklos (bark). Compare Breton rusk, Irish rúsc, Welsh rhisgl and Catalan rusc.

Noun[edit]

ruche f (plural ruches)

  1. (Jersey) frill