ruche

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See also: ruché

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from French ruche.

Noun[edit]

ruche (plural ruches)

  1. A strip of fabric which has been fluted or pleated.
  2. A small ruff of fluted or pleated fabric worn at neck or wrist.
  3. A pile of arched tiles, used to catch and retain oyster spawn.

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

ruche (third-person singular simple present ruches, present participle ruching, simple past and past participle ruched)

  1. To flute or pleat fabric.
    ruched curtains

Central Franconian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German rūchen, from Old High German *rūhhan, northern variant of riohhan.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ruche (third-person singular present rüch, past tense roch, past participle jeroche)

  1. (Ripuarian, transitive or intransitive) to smell

French[edit]

des ruches (1)
des ruches décoratives (2)

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French rusche, from Medieval Latin rusca (bark), from Gaulish *ruskā, from Proto-Celtic *rūsklos (bark). Compare Breton rusk, Irish rusg, Welsh rhisgl and Catalan rusc.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ruche f (plural ruches)

  1. hive, beehive
  2. (textiles, fashion) ruffle; flounce; ruche

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from French ruche.

Noun[edit]

ruche f (invariable)

  1. ruche

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Noun[edit]

ruche f (plural ruches)

  1. (Jersey) frill