sapor

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See also: såpor

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin sapor (taste, flavor).

Noun[edit]

sapor (plural sapors)

  1. (now rare) A type of taste (sweetness, sourness etc.); loosely, taste, flavor.
    • 1638, Thomas Herbert, Some Yeares Travels, II:
      But, though the savour bee so base, the sapor is so excellent, that no meat, no sauce, no vessell pleases the Guzurats pallat, save what relishes of it.

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From sapiō (taste of, have a flavor of).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sapor m (genitive sapōris); third declension

  1. A taste, flavor, savor.
    • c. 37 BCE – 30 BCE, Virgil, Georgicon 4.267
      proderit et tunsum gallae admiscere saporem []
      It’ is good too to blend a taste of pounded oak-apples []
  2. A sense of taste.
  3. A smell, scent, odor.
  4. (usually in the plural) That which tastes good; a delicacy, dainty.
  5. (figuratively) An elegance of style or character.

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative sapor sapōrēs
genitive sapōris sapōrum
dative sapōrī sapōribus
accusative sapōrem sapōrēs
ablative sapōre sapōribus
vocative sapor sapōrēs

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • sapor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • sapor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “sapor”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • sapor” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • sapor in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • sapor in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray