scientia

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Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From sciēns, present participle of sciō ‎(I know, understand).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

scientia f ‎(genitive scientiae); first declension

  1. knowledge
    1597, Sir Francis Bacon, Meditationes Sacrae:
    Nam et ipsa scientia potestas est.
    And thus knowledge itself is power.

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative scientia scientiae
genitive scientiae scientiārum
dative scientiae scientiīs
accusative scientiam scientiās
ablative scientiā scientiīs
vocative scientia scientiae

Descendants[edit]

Participle[edit]

scientia

  1. nominative neuter plural of sciēns
  2. accusative neuter plural of sciēns
  3. vocative neuter plural of sciēns

References[edit]

  • scientia in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • scientia in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • SCIENTIA in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • scientia in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to possess literary knowledge: litterarum scientiam (only in sing.) habere
    • to acquire knowledge of a subject: scientiam alicuius rei consequi
    • (ambiguous) to acquire knowledge of a subject: scientia comprehendere aliquid
    • (ambiguous) to enrich a person's knowledge: scientia augere aliquem
    • (ambiguous) logic, dialectic: dialectica (-ae or -orum) (pure Latin disserendi ratio et scientia)
    • (ambiguous) geographical knowledge: regionum terrestrium aut maritimarum scientia