silva

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See also: Silva and silvă

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin silva. Doublet of selva.

Noun[edit]

silva (uncountable)

  1. (forestry) The forest trees of a particular area
    • 1909, Willis Linn Jepson, The Trees of California, page 13:
      The most interesting and striking features of the silva of California relate to its composition, the geographical distribution of the species and their biological history.

Alternative forms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Silvas

Etymology[edit]

From Old Galician/Old Portuguese silva, from Latin silva (forest).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

silva f (plural silvas)

  1. bramble, blackberry bush
    • 1460, José Antonio Souto Cabo (ed.), Crónica de Santa María de Íria. Santiago: Ediciós do Castro, page 101:
      vijã grande[s] lumes de candeas arder de noyte et de dia en huũ monte muy espeso de muytas aruores et siluas, a oyto mjlias de Yria
      they saw large candle fires, burning day and night, in a very close forest, of trees and bambles, eight milles from Iria
    • 1884, Marcial Valladares Núñez, Diccionario gallego-castellano, s.v. silva:
      Tente, silva; non me prendas, que n'estou n'a miña tèrra (traditional song)
      Hold yourself, bramble, don't catch me, 'cos I'm not in my country
  2. (archaic) forest

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • silua” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006–2022.
  • silua” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006–2018.
  • silva” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • silva” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • silva” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *sel-, *swel- (firewood, wood, beam, board, frame, threshold). Cognate with Ancient Greek ὕλη (húlē, wood, timber) and Old English syl (sill, threshold, foundation).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

silva f (genitive silvae); first declension

  1. wood, forest
  2. orchard, grove

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative silva silvae
Genitive silvae silvārum
Dative silvae silvīs
Accusative silvam silvās
Ablative silvā silvīs
Vocative silva silvae

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Asturian: selva, silva
  • Catalan: selva
  • English: silva, sylva
  • French: sylve
  • Padanian:
  • Galician: silva

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

silvas

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Portuguese silva, from Latin silva, from Proto-Indo-European *swel-, *sel- (mountain, ridge, forest). Compare the doublet selva and Galician silva.

The /i/ is puzzling. Philologist Leite de Vasconcelos felt that the word was not a Latinism and conjectured a term spīna *silvea with the same suffix as ligneus and pīneus, where the close post-tonic vowel would cause the stressed vowel to rise, as in marisma and sirgo[1].

Noun[edit]

silva f (plural silvas)

  1. bramble (any of various thorny shrubs, especially those in the family Rubus)
    Synonyms: espinheiro, sarça
  2. (in particular) blackberry (Rubus fruticosus)
    Synonyms: amoreira, amora-silvestre, amoreira-silvestre

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

silva

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of silvar
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of silvar

References[edit]

  1. ^ 1920, Leite de Vasconcellos, Revista Lusitana, volume 23, page 188

Romanian[edit]

Noun[edit]

silva f

  1. definite singular nominative of silvă