songer

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English songere, from Old English sangere ‎(a singer), from Proto-Germanic *sangwārijaz ‎(singer), equivalent to song +‎ -er. Cognate with Saterland Frisian Sjunger, West Frisian sjonger, Dutch zanger, German Low German Sänger, German Sänger, Danish sanger, Swedish sångare, Icelandic söngvari ‎(singer).

Noun[edit]

songer ‎(plural songers)

  1. (rare, archaic, poetic, sometimes humorous) A singer (of songs); a songster
    • 1902, Interstate Druggist - Volume 3:
      If a man who plays at ping pong is a "ponger," Then a singer of a "singsong" is a "songer"; If the "songer" is a singer. Then the "ponger" is a "pinger," And the man who says it's wrong must be a "wronger."
    • 1976, Katie Lee, Ten Thousand Goddam Cattle:
      Will he sing it, I wonder?" "Chantoozie, I ain't much of a songer any more. I just done that because I was told it was a colorful trait.
    • 2012, Susan St. Francis, A Tale of the Bug Fairies:
      No sound of songers chirping or jumbies, foraging for nuts.

Cebuano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Blend of song +‎ singer

Noun[edit]

songer

  1. (humorous) A person (a nonsinger) with a surprisingly good singing voice.

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French songier, from Latin somniāre, present active infinitive of somniō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

songer

  1. (intransitive, literary, with de) to dream
  2. (intransitive, with à) to think (about), consider (that)
  3. (intransitive) to ponder, to imagine, to consider
    • 1820, Victor Hugo, Lettres à la Fiancée:
      Quant à moi, je suis tout joyeux quand je songe que tu es à moi
      As for me, I am so happy when I imagine you are mine.
  4. (transitive, literary) to dream about
  5. (transitive) to be preoccupied by, with

Related terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Conjugation[edit]

This is a regular -er verb, but the stem is written songe- before endings that begin with -a- or -o- (to indicate that the -g- is a “soft” /ʒ/ and not a “hard” /ɡ/). This spelling-change occurs in all verbs in -ger, such as neiger and manger.

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

songer

  1. to dream

Conjugation[edit]

  • As parler except an extra e is inserted after the final g before a and o.
  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

Related terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Old French[edit]

Verb[edit]

songer

  1. Alternative form of songier

Conjugation[edit]

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. In the present tense an extra supporting e is needed in the first-person singular indicative and throughout the singular subjunctive, and the third-person singular subjunctive ending -t is lost. In addition, g becomes j before an a or an o to keep the /dʒ/ sound intact. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.