stive

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Apparently from a Middle Dutch noun related to stuiven and cognate to German Staub (dust).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stive

  1. The floating dust in a flour mill caused by the operation of grinding.[2]
    • 1867, The British Farmer's Magazine, Volum LII, New Series, page 231,
      The removal of the heated air, steam, stive, and flour from the millstones, is a proposition which does not appear to be more than sufficiently well understood.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English stīven.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

stive (third-person singular simple present stives, present participle stiving, simple past and past participle stived)

  1. (UK, dialect, transitive, intransitive) To stew; to be stifled or suffocated.
    • 1796, Amelia Simmons, American Cookery, 1996 Bicentennial Facsimile Edition, page 64,
      Let your cucumbers be ſmall, freſh gathered, and free from ſpots; then make a pickle of ſalt and water, ſtrong enough to bear an egg; boil the pickle and ſkim it well, and then pour it upon your cucumbers, and ſtive them down for twenty four hours; [] .

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

stive

  1. Obsolete form of stew.

Etymology 4[edit]

Related to Italian stivàre, Portuguese estivar.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

stive (third-person singular simple present stives, present participle stiving, simple past and past participle stived)

  1. (transitive, sometimes with "up") To compress, to cram.
    • 1641, Henry Wotton, A Parallel between Robert late Earl of Essex and George late Duke of Buckingham:
      His chamber being commonly stived with friends or suitors of one kind or other.
    • 1836, T. S. Davis (editor), Kitchen Poetry, Every Body's Album, Volume 1, page 172,
      And here I mist stay, / In this stived up kitchen to work all day.
    • 1851, Sylvester Judd, Margaret: A Tale of the Real and Ideal, Blight and Bloom, 1871, page 284,
      "Things are a good deal stived up," answered the Deacon.

References[edit]

  1. ^ stive in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911
  2. ^ 1880, Leo de Colange, The American Dictionary of Commerce []

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

stive

  1. plural and definite singular attributive of stiv

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈsti.ve/
  • Rhymes: -ive
  • Hyphenation: stì‧ve

Noun[edit]

stive f

  1. plural of stiva

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Adjective[edit]

stive

  1. Alternative form of stif

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Adjective[edit]

stive

  1. definite singular of stiv
  2. plural of stiv

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Adjective[edit]

stive

  1. definite singular of stiv
  2. plural of stiv