stif

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See also: stif-

Cornish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Revived Middle Cornish) IPA(key): [stiːf]
  • (Revived Late Cornish) IPA(key): [stiːf]

Noun[edit]

stif m (plural stifow)

  1. A jet, squirt; a stream of fluid or gas
  2. (aviation) A jet plane; Type of airplane propelled by jet engines instead of propellers

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Cornish-English Dictionary from Maga's Online Dictionary
  • 2018, Akademi Kernewek Gerlyver Kernewek (FSS) Cornish Dictionary (SWF) (2018 edition, p.173)

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English stīf, from Proto-West Germanic *stīf. The variant with a short vowel is probably from the comparative.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

stif (comparative stiffer, superlative stiffeste)

  1. Stiff, firm, hard; difficult to move or manipulate.
  2. Strong, fixed, hardy well-built; constructed as to last.
  3. Having strong resolve; unyielding or strong-minded.
  4. Daring, audacious, valiant, boastful.
  5. Having great strength, might or ability; mightful.
  6. Having great force or potence; forceful.
  7. Bloody, injurious, wounding; causing injury or challenge.
  8. (rare) Runny; having a high viscosity.
  9. (rare) Rough; not smooth to the touch.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: stiff
  • Scots: stif, stiff, steif

References[edit]

Adverb[edit]

stif (plural and weak singular stiffer, comparative stiffest)

  1. Stiffly, firmly, unmoveably; in a way that is difficult to move or manipulate.
  2. With strong resolve; unyieldingly or strong-mindedly.
  3. Bloodily, injuriously, woundingly; in a way causing injury or challenge.
  4. (rare) Daringly, bravely, forcefully, totally.

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *stīf.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

stif

  1. Stiff, firm, hard
  2. Strong, fixed

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]