thorny

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See also: Þorný

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English thorny, þorny, þorni, from Old English þorniġ (full of thorns; thorny), from Proto-Germanic *þurnugaz (thorny), equivalent to thorn +‎ -y. Cognate with West Frisian toarnich (thorny), Dutch doornig (thorny), Low German doornig (thorny), German dornig (thorny).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

thorny (comparative thornier, superlative thorniest)

  1. having thorns or spines
  2. troublesome or vexatious
    • Shakespeare
      the steep and thorny way to heaven
  3. aloof and irritable
    • Louisa May Alcott, Good Wives
      'Come, Jo, don't be thorny. After studying himself to a skeleton all the week, a fellow deserves petting, and ought to get it.'

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Inherited from Old English þorniġ, from Proto-Germanic *þurnugaz; equivalent to thorn +‎ -y.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

thorny

  1. Having many thorns or spines; thorny.
  2. (rare) Covered in thorny plants.
  3. (rare) Having a shape like a thorn.
Descendants[edit]
  • English: thorny
  • Scots: thorny
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From thorn +‎ -en (infinitival suffix).

Verb[edit]

thorny

  1. Alternative form of thornen