wid

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Alteration of with.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

wid

  1. (informal or dialectal) with
    • 1893, Stephen Crane, Maggie: A Girl of the Streets [1]
      “An’ wid all d’ bringin’ up she had, how could she?” moaningly she asked of her son. “Wid all d’ talkin’ wid her I did an’ d’ t’ings I tol’ her to remember. When a girl is bringed up d’ way I bringed up Maggie, how kin she go teh d’ devil?”
    • 1922, Eugene O'Neill, The Hairy Ape, [2]
      Oh, there was fine beautiful ships them days—clippers wid tall masts touching the sky—fine strong men in them—men that was sons of the sea as if ’twas the mother that bore them.
    • 1940, Shirley Graham, “It’s Morning,” in Black Female Playwrights, Kathy A Perkins ed. [3]
      Cissie. But, when da saints ob God go marchin’ home
      Mah gal will sing! Wid all da pure, bright stars,
      Tuhgedder wid da mawnin’ stars—She’ll sing!

Anagrams[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wīdaz, whence also Old Frisian wīd, Old Saxon wīd, Old High German wīt, Old Norse víðr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

wīd

  1. wide, far

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]