workers of the world, unite

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English[edit]

The motto in many languages on a DDR building
Marx's grave at Highgate Cemetery, bearing the slogan "Workers of All Lands Unite"
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Etymology[edit]

The phrase, one of the most famous rallying cries of communism, comes from Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels' The Communist Manifesto; later the official motto of the Soviet Union. A variation (workers of all lands, unite!) is inscribed on Marx's tombstone. The actual translation is more normally given as "Working men", or "Proletarians of all countries, unite!" (Proletarier aller Länder, vereinigt euch!).

Phrase[edit]

workers of the world, unite!

  1. Laborers are encouraged to unionize or otherwise engage in collective action on a global scale in order to use the strength of their numbers to obtain better conditions.

Translations[edit]