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Translingual[edit]

Han character[edit]

(radical 140 +13, 19 strokes, cangjie input 廿戈人木 (TIOD), composition)

  1. drugs, pharmaceuticals, medicine

References[edit]

  • KangXi: not present, would follow page 1062, character 44
  • Dai Kanwa Jiten: character 32188
  • Hanyu Da Zidian: not present, would follow volume 5, page 3303, character 5
  • Unihan data for U+85AC

Cantonese[edit]

Hanzi[edit]

(Yale yeuk3)

  1. This entry needs a definition. Please add one, then remove {{defn}}.

Japanese[edit]

Kanji[edit]

(grade 3 “Kyōiku” kanjishinjitai kanji, kyūjitai form )

Readings[edit]

Compounds[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Kanji in this term
くす
Grade: 3
kun'yomi

From Old Japanese. Cognate with the kusu root of adjective 奇し (kusushi, mystical)[1], from the way that drugs and medicines would have mystical effects.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

(shinjitai kanji, kyūjitai kanji , hiragana くす, romaji kusu)

  1. A medicine or drug.
Usage notes[edit]

Only used in compounds.

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Kanji in this term
くすり
Grade: 3
kun'yomi

Derivation from kusu above. Appears to be the 連用形 (ren'yōkei, continuative or noun form) of hypothetical verb kusuru “to have a mystical effect”.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

(shinjitai kanji, kyūjitai kanji , hiragana くすり, romaji kusuri)

  1. A substance with mystical properties, especially one that has an effect on the body, health, or lifespan.
  2. A medicine or drug, a pharmaceutical.
  3. A chemical, generally toxic and used for its effect on living organisms, such as insecticide or herbicide.
  4. A substance that has a beneficial effect in improving or maintaining one's health.
  5. (figuratively) Something that has a beneficial effect in correcting one's mistakes.
  6. Abbreviation of 釉薬 (uwagusuri): A glaze or enamel applied to ceramics.
  7. Gunpowder (from the “mystical substance” sense, and the second character in the word 火薬 (kayaku, gunpowder)).
  8. (figuratively) A small bribe.
Usage notes[edit]

The medicine sense is probably the most common in modern Japanese.

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Kanji in this term
やく
Grade: 3
on'yomi

From Middle Chinese (yak, drug, medicine). Compare modern Cantonese (yeuk6).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

(shinjitai kanji, kyūjitai kanji , hiragana やく, romaji yaku)

  1. (slang) A medicine or drug, especially a narcotic or other recreational drug.
Usage notes[edit]

The slang meaning is generally limited to when the term yaku is used as a standalone noun. In compounds, yaku refers more generally to pharmaceuticals, or sometimes chemicals.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 1988, 国語大辞典(新装版) (Kokugo Dai Jiten, Revised Edition) (in Japanese), Tōkyō: Shogakukan
  2. 2.0 2.1 2006, 大辞林 (Daijirin), Third Edition (in Japanese), Tōkyō: Sanseidō, ISBN 4-385-13905-9

Korean[edit]

Hanja[edit]

(yak) (hangeul , revised yak, McCune-Reischauer yak, Yale yak)

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Mandarin[edit]

Hanzi[edit]

(Pinyin yào (yao4), Wade-Giles yao4)

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