aust

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Latvian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From an earlier *aus-ti, from Proto-Baltic *aus-, from Proto-Indo-European *āws-, *aws- (to shine) (< *h₂ews-), from a stem *awes- (*h₂éwes-). Cognates include Lithuanian aũšti (< *austi), Old Church Slavonic за устра (za ustra, early in the morning), Hittite au(š)- (to see, to watch), Sanskrit उच्छति (uccháti, to dawn), उषस् (uṣás), उसृ (usṛ́), Ancient Greek ἠώς (ēṓs) (< *āusōs), Latin aurōra (< *ausōsā).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

(file)

Verb[edit]

aust

  1. 3rd person singular present indicative form of aust
  2. 3rd person plural present indicative form of aust
  3. (with the particle lai) 3rd person singular imperative form of aust
  4. (with the particle lai) 3rd person plural imperative form of aust

aust intr., 1st conj., only 3rd personpres. aust, past ausa

  1. (of time period) to dawn (to become light at the beginning of the day)
    rīts ausa lēni ― the morning dawned slowly
    lieliskā spožumā aust jaunā diena ― in great splendor dawns the new day
  2. (of light, light sources) to dawn, to appear slowly (in the sky)
    austrumos ausa gaisma ― the light dawned in the east
    austošā saule ― the dawning sun
    zvaigznes aust ― the stars are dawning (= appearing)
    tur ausa vēlīns pavasara mēness ― there dawned (= appeared) the belated spring moon
  3. (figuratively) to appear, to begin
    no padomēm mums brīve ausa! ― from the councils liberty dawned to us!
    acīs meitenēm aust mīlas smaids ― a lovely smile dawned in the girls' eyes
  4. (rare, of memories) to come back, to reach awareness
    atmiņā aust bijušās dienas ― the past days are dawning in (one's) memory
Conjugation[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
prefixed verbs:
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From earlier *aus-ti, from Proto-Baltic *aud-, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ew-dʰ-, from *h₂ew- (to braid, to weave) (earlier “to tie, to bind”), with an extra -dʰ. The present form comes from *aud-yō > *aužuo > aužu. Cognates include Lithuanian áusti, Proto-Slavic *usti (Russian dialectal усло (uslo, a started fabric, canvas), Sanskrit ओतुः (ótuḥ, tissue; web).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

(file)

Verb[edit]

aust tr., 1st conj., pres. aužu, aud, auž, past aužu

  1. to weave (to produce fabric from thread in a loom)
    aust linu audeklu ― to weave linen cloth
    aust kokvilnas audumus ― to weave cotton fabric
    aužamās stelles ― (weaving) loom
    fabrikas audējas auž jaunu vilnas kleitu drānu ― the factory weaves weave a new dress cloth/fabric
    aust šitās meitas vairs neprata, vērpt negribēja ― these girls can't weave anymore, and they don't want to spin (either)
  2. to weave (to produce fabric, cloth for a certain object; to produce fabric, cloth with certain patterns)
    aust dvieļus, maisus ― to weave towels, sacks
    aust linus, vilnu ― to weave linen (flax), wool
    es aužu linu kreklu ― I am weaving a linen shirt
    tie senos rakstus auž, ko tēvi auduši ― there they weave the old symbols/patterns that (our) fathers (= ancestors) (used to) weave
  3. to weave (to make a mesh, a net, a web; also of spiders)
    zvejnieks laivā tīklus auž ― the fisherman is in (his) boat weaving his net
    zirneklis auž tīklu ― the spider is weaving (its) web
Conjugation[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
prefixed verbs:
other derived terms:

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 “aust” in Konstantīns Karulis (1992, 2001), Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca, in 2 vols, Rīga: AVOTS, ISBN: 9984-700-12-7

Norwegian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse austr, from Proto-Germanic *austrą.

Noun[edit]

aust n (definite singular austen)

  1. east
    Ved soloppgang står sola i aust.
    The Sun is in the east at sunrise.
References[edit]
  • “aust” in The Bokmål Dictionary / The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse austr.

Adverb[edit]

aust

  1. east
References[edit]
  • “aust” in The Bokmål Dictionary / The Nynorsk Dictionary.